Battle Credits-Society of the 3rd Infantry Division.-Page 3


Battle Credits

  

Contents - Society of the 3ID Website

Last Update December 08, 2014 

Click Here to read about the 3ID Medal of Honor Recipients

 

The 25 Campaigns of the 3ID
By
Dr. Judith F. Brown
3ID historian
912-767-7885
judith.f.brown@us.army.mil


World War I: Aisne; Champagne-Marne; Aisne-Marne; St. Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne; Champagne 1918

World War II: Algeria-French Morocco (with arrowhead); Tunisia; Sicily (with arrowhead); Naples-Foggia; Anzio[CTB] (with arrowhead); Rome-Arno; Southern France (with arrowhead); Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe

Korean War: CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953


Global War on Terror: Iraq

Where I have "(with arrowhead)" after four WWII campaigns, you should also put that on the list of campaigns on the back of Watch on the Rhine. "With arrowhead" signifies that a unit, in this case the 3ID, took part in the invasion that began that particular campaign. The 3ID took part in four invasions in WWII, so it has (with arrowhead) after the name of four campaigns. So far as I know, no other division in the US Army in WWII--and there were 90--participated in more invasions.

You must also delete all references to the campaigns of the Persian Gulf War. A Division as a whole can only receive campaign credit if its headquarters took part in that particular conflict. During the Gulf War the 3ID HQ remained in Germany, so the Division as a whole does not get credit for it and cannot carry those campaign streamers on its flag. The smaller units and the 3d Brigade of the 3ID did participate in the Gulf War. So they have the credit and may carry either or both of these streamers, depending on when they arrived in SW Asia.

Concerning the present conflict: The correct designation and the only correct designation is "Global War on Terror: Iraq" and that is what should appear on the back of Watch on the Rhine. If you want to list operations that the 3ID has participated in, that's fine, but you should do so in a different place. (And by the way, I have a list of operations in which the 3ID participated in Baghdad during OIF III.)

The reason for this is because an operation and a campaign are two different things. For the purposes of this message, an Operation is named by a unit, like the 3ID naming "Operation Marne Avalanche", or by someone in DOD who at the beginning of the conflict called it "Operation Iraqi Freedom". A campaign, on the other hand, one that will be listed on a unit's lineage and honors, is named by a specific DOD organization, the Military Awards Branch (telephone number is 703-325-8700) well after the campaign has begun and usually after it has ended. Each campaign has certain criteria: time limitations, combat zone area, percentage of a unit that must be in the area at the appropriate time for the unit to get the campaign credit, etc. (For example, the Sicily campaign in WWII has a time limitation of 9 July 1943 for ground troops to 17 August 1943 and the combat zone was Sicily and adjacent waters. Any unit that arrived in Sicily after 17 August 43 did not get credit for that campaign. The War Department published the campaign names, geographical and time limits, and names of units receiving for the campaign credit in a GO months after the campaign was over.)

In the present case, the Military Awards Branch stated on June 15, 2006 that there would be three campaign participation credits awarded to units that served in and/or are serving in the theater of operations supporting the GWOT, no matter how long the conflict lasts or how many times the unit goes to one place. Military Awards officially called the conflict the Global War on Terror and said there will be one streamer for Iraq, one streamer for Afghanistan, and a third general streamer for units supporting the GWOT in places like Kuwait, Qatar, etc. If a unit goes once to Iraq and once to Afghanistan, it gets two streamers, one for each country. If it goes ten times to one country, it only gets one streamer. Military Awards could have given separate campaign credits for each year in Iraq, like OIF I, OIF III, etc. and kept adding them as it went along, but it didn't. I have no idea why it did what it did. If you put Military Awards Branch and Iraq in a search engine, you should come up with the article on Military.com on June 16, 2006 that tells of this decision by Military Awards Branch.

So, basically, the 3ID only gets one streamer/campaign credit for all its service in Iraq. I have not seen any citation for this. As far as I know, a unit applies to Military Awards for the campaign credit, stating when and where it was, and Military Awards approves or disapproves the application. There is no citation, such as that the 3ID got when it was awarded the PUC for its actions spearheading the offensive in Iraq in 2003.

If you need any more information and/or clarity, don't hesitate to write or call me, because I know it can be very confusing.

Dr. Judith F. Brown
3ID historian
912-767-7885
judith.f.brown@us.army.mil
brownjudithf@yahoo.com

 

WWII Hero Earned Medal of Honor for Protecting His Men
From Times Staff and Wire Reports



Image from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

July 29, 2008 - Michael J. Daly, who received the Medal of Honor for heroism as a 20-year-old lieutenant in World War II, died of cancer Friday at his home in Fairfield, Conn. He was 83.
President Truman presented Daly with the medal for valor in combat for his actions on April 18, 1945, in Nuremberg, Germany.

According to the Congressional Medal of Honor Society website, Daly engaged in four single-handed firefights to protect his men, killing 15 Germans, silencing three enemy machine guns and wiping out an entire enemy patrol. He was later promoted to captain.

"I'm no hero," Daly often said, according to the Connecticut Post. "The heroes are those who gave their lives."

Daly was born Sept. 15, 1924, in New York City to a prominent family. His great-grandfather Thomas F. Gilroy was an Irish immigrant who was mayor of New York City in the 1890s. Daly's father, Paul, was a lawyer and a decorated veteran of World Wars I and II. One of Daly's brothers was T.F. Gilroy Daly, an Army Ranger who became a well-known trial lawyer and federal judge.

Reared in Fairfield, Daly attended the U.S. Military Academy but left after one year. He enlisted in the Army and became an infantryman in the Third Division of the Seventh Army during World War II. Daly was also awarded three Silver Stars, two Purple Hearts and a Bronze Star with "V" for acts of bravery. Fewer than 30 World War II Medal of Honor recipients are still alive.

Daly was modest about his military accomplishments. "Anybody would have done what I did," he told a friend. "Luck is important in life, but in combat it is crucial. The bravest things are often done with God the only witness."

Following the war, Daly returned to Fairfield and began a career as a manufacturer's representative and an entrepreneur. He devoted a substantial part of his life to St. Vincent's Medical Center in Bridgeport, Conn. He was one of the hospital's first lay trustees and served on its board for more than 30 years. He was also instrumental in developing financial support for the hospital. Ronald J. Bianchi, St. Vincent's corporate senior vice president, announced that the new St. Vincent's emergency wing would be named after Daly.

Survivors include his wife of 50 years, Margaret Wallace Daly; two sisters; a daughter; a son; a stepson; four stepdaughters; and three grandsons.
Copyright 2008 Los Angeles Times

Daly, Michael J.

Rank and organization: Captain (then Lieutenant), U.S. Army, Company A, 15th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Nuremberg, Germany, 18 April 1945. Entered service at: Southport, Conn. Born: 15 September 1924, New York, N.Y. G.O. No.: 77, 10 September 1945. Citation: Early in the morning of 18 April 1945, he led his company through the shell-battered, sniper-infested wreckage of Nuremberg, Germany. When blistering machinegun fire caught his unit in an exposed position, he ordered his men to take cover, dashed forward alone, and, as bullets whined about him, shot the 3-man gun crew with his carbine. Continuing the advance at the head of his company, he located an enemy patrol armed with rocket launchers which threatened friendly armor. He again went forward alone, secured a vantage point and opened fire on the Germans. Immediately he became the target for concentrated machine pistol and rocket fire, which blasted the rubble about him. Calmly, he continued to shoot at the patrol until he had killed all 6 enemy infantrymen. Continuing boldly far in front of his company, he entered a park, where as his men advanced, a German machinegun opened up on them without warning. With his carbine, he killed the gunner; and then, from a completely exposed position, he directed machinegun fire on the remainder of the crew until all were dead. In a final duel, he wiped out a third machinegun emplacement with rifle fire at a range of 10 yards. By fearlessly engaging in 4 single-handed fire fights with a desperate, powerfully armed enemy, Lt. Daly, voluntarily taking all major risks himself and protecting his men at every opportunity, killed 15 Germans, silenced 3 enemy machineguns and wiped out an entire enemy patrol. His heroism during the lone bitter struggle with fanatical enemy forces was an inspiration to the valiant Americans who took Nuremberg.
Michael J. Daly was a member of Outpost 5 of the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division.


 

Army Hero Wins Medal of Honor for Valor in Iraq
Bush Bestows Highest Military Honor
to Sgt. Paul Ray Smith Posthumously

By William Branigin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, April 4, 2005


President Bush, right, presents the Medal of Honor posthumously awarded to Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Ray Smith in the East Room of the White House Monday. Accepting the medal on his father's behalf is Smith's 11-year-old son, David. Smith's daughter Jessica, left, and his wife, Birgit, watch. (LARRY DOWNING - Reuters)


Birgit Smith, wife of Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Smith, addresses the audience during the Pentagon Hall of Heroes induction ceremony honoring her husband on April 5, 2005.
DoD photograph by Helene C. Stikkel

Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Ray Smith today became the first soldier to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Iraq, receiving the nation's highest award for valor posthumously exactly two years after he was killed in a battle near Baghdad's airport.

    

David Smith cradles the Medal of Honor presented to him on behalf of his father Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Smith by President George W. Bush at the White House, on Apr. 4, 2005.
DoD photos by Staff Sgt. D. Myles Cullen, US Air Force

President Bush presented the award to Smith's 11-year-old son, David, in a White House ceremony also attended by the medal-recipient's widow, Birgit, and teenaged daughter, Jessica, as well as his mother and stepfather. Also in attendance were Secretary Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Richard B. Myers, other top Pentagon officials, congressional leaders, five living Medal of Honor recipients and members of Smith's unit in the Army's 3rd Infantry Division.

Sgt. 1st Class Smith, 33, of Tampa, was mortally wounded on April 4, 2003, while holding off an attack by at least 100 Iraqi Special Republican Guard troops against a vulnerable U.S. position just east of the Baghdad airport. The veteran of the Persian Gulf War was directing his platoon of the 11th Engineer Battalion in setting up a holding area for enemy prisoners of war when the unit came under fire. ...

"He saved everybody out there," said Pvt. Michael Seaman, of St. Clair, Mich., who was in the M-113 feeding Smith ammunition as the sergeant manned the machine gun.

In his speech at today's ceremony in the East Room of the White House, Bush quoted Seaman, who was in the audience, as saying that Smith had been hard on his men in training, "because he knew we had to be hard in battle." Bush said Seaman and others "are alive today because of Sergeant Smith's discipline."
He observed that more than half those awarded the Medal of Honor since World War II sacrificed their lives in the actions for which they were cited.


Birgit Smith caresses the headstone of her late husband Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Smith after it was unveiled at Arlington Cemetery on April 5, 2005.
DoD photograph by Staff Sgt. Reeba Critser, U.S. Army.

Click here for entire story.

 

Iraq Hero Joins Hallowed Group
President Bush will present America's top award for bravery to the family
of the sergeant who died defending his soldiers.
By ALEX LEARY, Times Staff Writer

Published February 2, 2005

 
[Times photo: Brendan Fitterer]
Birgit Smith sits with her children David, 10, and Jessica, 18, at her home in Holiday
after learning her husband will receive the Medal of Honor.
 
 
Sgt. Paul Smith (right) is the first soldier from the Iraq war to get the medal,
which hadn't been awarded since 1993.

Sgt. 1st Class Paul R. Smith, who spent his boyhood in Tampa, became a man in the Army and died outside Baghdad defending his outnumbered soldiers from an Iraqi attack, will receive America's highest award for bravery. President Bush will present the Medal of Honor to Smith's wife, Birgit, and their children Jessica, 18, and David, 10, at a ceremony at the White House, possibly in March.
The official announcement will come soon, but the Pentagon called Mrs. Smith with the news Tuesday afternoon.

"We had faith he was going to get it," Mrs. Smith said from her home in Holiday, "but the phone call was shocking. It was overwhelming. My heart was racing, and I got sweaty hands. I yelled, "Oh, yes!' ... I'm still all shaky. "People know what's he's done ... people know that to get a Medal of Honor you have to be a special person or do something really great."

What Paul Smith did on April 4, 2003, was climb aboard an armored vehicle and, manning a heavy machine gun, take it upon himself to cover the withdrawal of his men from a suddenly vulnerable position. Smith was fatally wounded by Iraqi fire, the only American to die in the engagement.

"I'm in bittersweet tears," said Smith's mother, Janice Pvirre. "The medal isn't going to bring him back. ... It makes me sad that all these other soldiers have died. They are all heroes."

With the medal, Smith joins a most hallowed society. Since the Civil War, just 3,439 men (and one woman) have received the Medal of Honor. It recognizes only the most extreme examples of bravery - those "above and beyond the call of duty."

That oft-heard phrase has a specific meaning: The medal cannot be given to those who act under orders, no matter how heroic their actions. Indeed, according to Library of Congress defense expert David F. Burrelli, it must be "the type of deed which, if he had not done it, would not subject him to any justified criticism." From World War II on, most of the men who received the medal died in the action that led to their nomination. There are but 129 living recipients.

Smith is the first soldier from the Iraq war to receive the medal, which had not previously been awarded since 1993. In that year, two Army Special Services sergeants were killed in Somalia in an action described in the bestselling book Black Hawk Down. The officer who called Birgit Smith on Tuesday nominated her husband for the medal.

Lt. Col. Thomas Smith (no relation) sent in his recommendation in May 2003, beginning a process that involved reviews at 12 levels of the military chain of command before reaching the White House. On Tuesday, Lt. Col. Smith expressed satisfaction that the wait was over, and great admiration for his former subordinate. In the Army, he said, you hear about men who won the Medal of Honor. "You think they are myths when you read about them. It's almost movie like. You just don't think you'd ever meet someone like that."

Paul Smith, he said, was not a "soft soldier" who suddenly got tough under fire. "This was a guy whose whole life experience seemed building toward putting him in the position where he could do something like this. He was demanding on his soldiers all the time and was a stickler for all the things we try to enforce. It's just an amazing story."

Lt. Col. Smith commanded the 11th Engineer Battalion, 3rd Infantry Division, during the American attack on Iraq, which began March 20, 2003. On the morning of April 4, the engineers found themselves manning a roadblock not far from Baghdad International Airport. A call went out for a place to put some Iraqi prisoners.

Sgt. Smith volunteered to create a holding pen inside a walled courtyard. Soon, Iraqi soldiers, numbering perhaps 100, opened fire on Smith's position. Smith was accompanied by 16 men. Smith called for a Bradley, a tank-like vehicle with a rapid fire cannon. It arrived and opened up on the Iraqis. The enemy could not advance so long as the Bradley was in position. But then, in a move that baffled and angered Smith's men, the Bradley left. Smith's men, some of whom were wounded, were suddenly vulnerable. Smith could have justifiably ordered his men to withdraw. Lt. Col. Smith believes Sgt. Smith rejected that option, thinking that abandoning the courtyard would jeopardize about 100 GIs outside - including medics at an aid station.

Sgt. Smith manned a 50-caliber machine gun atop an abandoned armored personnel carrier and fought off the Iraqis, going through several boxes of ammunition fed to him by 21-year-old Pvt. Michael Seaman. As the battle wound down, Smith was hit in the head. He died before he could be evacuated from the scene. He was 33. The Times published a lengthy account of the battle, and Smith's life in January 2004. It can be seen at www.sptimes.com/paulsmith

Sgt. Matthew Keller was one of the men who fought with Smith in the courtyard. "He put himself in front of his soldiers that day and we survived because of his actions," Keller said Tuesday from Fort Stewart in Georgia. "He was thinking my men are in trouble and I'm going to do what is necessary to help them. He didn't care about his own safety." Some of the men who fought alongside Smith were sent back to Iraq last month. Keller, 26, is scheduled to return Feb. 15, but was scrambling Tuesday to delay his deployment to attend the medal ceremony in Washington. "I want to be there to support the family and show thanks for what Sgt. Smith did," Keller said.

Mrs. Smith moved to Holiday after her husband's death, to be near his parents. Her daughter, Jessica, recently moved out on her own and is thinking about going to college. Son David is a fifth-grader at Sunray Elementary School in Holiday. "From the beginning (David) didn't show much feelings, keeping to himself," Mrs. Smith said. "He thinks if he brings it up it will make me sad. He's trying to be the strong one. The day Paul left for Iraq he told David, "You're the man in the house now.'

"Paul is not forgotten," she said. "He's part of history now. It makes me feel proud, so honored that I was allowed to be part of Paul's life. Even today he's probably laughing at all of us, saying, "You're making way too big a deal out of me.'

"He did what he had to do to protect his men, not to get a medal."
2005 • All Rights Reserved • St. Petersburg Times
490 First Avenue South • St. Petersburg, FL 33701 • 727-893-8111
Online Story Click Here

 

America's First Secret Hero:
NCO's Heroism Earns Highest Award

By Col. Randy Pullen

Staff Sgt. Hiroshi Myamura is shown with President Dwight Eisenhower upon receiving the Medal of Honor. Myamura, like Sgt. 1st Class Paul Smith, received the medal while serving with the 3rd Infantry Division.

(Author’s note: The 3rd Infantry Division is one of the Army’s most-decorated units. Since 1917, this division has suffered some 35,000 wartime casualties. Fifty Marne Soldiers before Sgt. 1st Class Paul Smith have received the nation’s highest decoration for valor, the Medal of Honor. This is the story of one.

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, March 29, 2005) -- Fifty years ago an Army Reserve noncommissioned officer performed an act of heroism that led to him becoming America's first secret hero.

Manning a hilltop position near Taejon-ni, Korea, Cpl. Hiroshi Miyamura, formerly of the Enlisted Reserve Corps, was a long way from his home in Gallup, N.M. on the night of April 24, 1951.

A major Chinese Communist offensive had been launched against the United Nations line. Miyamura, a machine gun squad leader in Company H, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Division, was ordered by his platoon sergeant to take 15 men -- machine gunners, riflemen and ammo carriers -- to a hill south of the Imjin River and hold the position against the advancing Chinese Communists as long as possible.

He did exactly that.
 

 
This program on the Military Channel, (formerly Discovery Wings Channel) All times ET
http://military.discovery.com/tvlistings/episode.jsp?episode=3&cpi=107688&gid=14230&channel=MIL



Hiroshi Miyamura and  Joe Annello

Follow a group of Korean War veterans (including 3ID Society members Hiroshi Miyamura and  Joe Annello) back to the battlefields in "The Land of Morning Calm" where they fought as young men. The history of the conflict is revealed from the hands-on memories of warriors from the Army, Navy, Marines, and Air Force. Follow a group of Korean War veterans back to the battlefields in "The Land of Morning Calm" where they fought as young men. The history of the conflict is revealed from the hands-on memories of warriors from the Army, Navy, Marines, and Air Force.

A little background; Back in April l951, during the Chinese Spring offensive the 1st section of the Machine Gun Platoon of "H" Company was attacked and overrun during the Chinese assault on their position. During the attack, Sgt. Hiroshi Miyamura, Squad Leader of the 1st Squad fought courageously until overcome by the enemy attack. (For this action he was subsequently was awarded the C.M.H.) Sgt. Joe Annello, Squad leader of the 2nd Squad was severely wounded and unable to walk. Their Chinese captors began marching them north after the attack. Joe, unable to walk was carried by Hiroshi and the others for several miles until their Chinese captors told them that the wounded would have to be left beside the road as they were slowing down the column.

Aware of what normally was the fate of captives left behind , Hiroshi and the others able to walk said their solemn and tearful goodbyes to Joe thinking that they would never see alive again. Joe lay beside the road for two days, more dead than alive, until two Chinese soldiers came along the road and upon prodding him with their rifles heard a slight moan. They then left and returned with a stretcher that had two bicycle wheels attached to the center pf the litter. He (Joe) was transported to a nearby village that was occupied by a half dozen severely wounded soldiers.

In the Camp was an Air Force Pilot (Melvin J. Shadduck) that had sustained minor burns on his hands when his plane was shot down by the enemy. He alone tended to the care of the other wounded prisoners. (Three Americans and one Turk) After two weeks in the village, this man decided that the only alternative to to seek by escape from the village. He did escape and a week later he wounded experienced a bombing attack of the surrounding hills of the village and that afternoon heard rumbling coming from the southern area of the village. They were shortly thereafter rescued by Tanks from the 1st Cavalry Division.
(From Ed Dojutrek, Society of 3ID Historian)

Miyamura, Hiroshi

Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Army, Company H, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Taejon-ni, Korea, 24 and 25 April 1951. Entered service at: Gallup, N. Mex. Birth: Gallup, N. Mex. G.O. No.: 85, 4 November 1953. Citation: Cpl. Miyamura, a member of Company H, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. On the night of 24 April, Company H was occupying a defensive position when the enemy fanatically attacked threatening to overrun the position. Cpl. Miyamura, a machinegun squad leader, aware of the imminent danger to his men unhesitatingly jumped from his shelter wielding his bayonet in close hand-to-hand combat killing approximately 10 of the enemy. Returning to his position, he administered first aid to the wounded and directed their evacuation. As another savage assault hit the line, he manned his machinegun and delivered withering fire until his ammunition was expended. He ordered the squad to withdraw while he stayed behind to render the gun inoperative. He then bayoneted his way through infiltrated enemy soldiers to a second gun emplacement and assisted in its operation. When the intensity of the attack necessitated the withdrawal of the company Cpl. Miyamura ordered his men to fall back while he remained to cover their movement. He killed more than 50 of the enemy before his ammunition was depleted and he was severely wounded. He maintained his magnificent stand despite his painful wounds, continuing to repel the attack until his position was overrun. When last seen he was fighting ferociously against an overwhelming number of enemy soldiers. Cpl. Miyamura's indomitable heroism and consummate devotion to duty reflect the utmost glory on himself and uphold the illustrious traditions on the military service.

 

Distinguished Unit Citations and
Battle Credits (WWI, WWII, Korea)

Click on Images for Larger Views
Battle Credits WWII
WWI
WWII
 
Korea

Company K,15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division  (Third Award) is cited for extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Surang-NI, Korea during the period 10 June to 11 June 1953.  Defending a critical sector of the battlefront, the company was subjected to repeated attacks by numerically superior Chinese Communist Forces.  Enemy assaults ranging from company size to a reinforced regiment were directed against the company's position in repeated waves in a desperate attempt to take the critical outpost (Harry).  By massing his strength in depth, the enemy was at times successful in penetrating friendly positions but was consistently pushed back by members of this company following rigorous hand to hand combat.  On the night of 10 June, a reinforced regiment, employing small arms fire, automatic weapons and grenades, and supported by 20,000 rounds of artillery fire and mortar fire, launched the initial assault of a series of new attacks on the position. Although having sustained over 200 casualties in their initial attempt to overtake the outpost, the enemy was determined to seize the key terrain at all costs and charged repeatedly throughout the night of 10 June and the following morning.  During the height of the battle the trenches at times were overrun, but met with the inspired close-in fighting of the beleaguered but courageous members of Company K, the enemy was ultimately repelled from the position.  The extraordinary heroism of the members of Company K, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division ,in fulfilling their assigned mission reflects great credit on themselves and upholds the highest traditions of the military service.

 

Company B , 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division  (Third Award) is cited for extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Surang-NI, Korea during the period 11 June to 12 June 1953.  During the night of 11 June, while occupying a vitally important outpost (Harry), the members of this unit successfully repelled several determined attempts by the Chinese Communist Forces to overtake their position.  The enemy, moving up through its own artillery and mortar fire in an attempt to seize the key terrain occupied by Company B ,  assaulted the outpost repeatedly with forces up to regimental strength.  With reinforced firepower, the enemy at times was successful in penetrating friendly lines but was subsequently expelled by the members of the defending unit in bitter hand to hand combat, thereby re-establishing the outpost line.  On two separate occasions the assaults by the hostile forces were beaten off by close-in fighting and aggressive counter attack, causing the enemy forces to turn back with heavy casualties.  By early morning of 12 June, the enemy had been forced to withdraw from the entire position and cease action.  The extraordinary heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed of the members of Company B , 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division  ,in fulfilling their assigned mission reflects great credit on themselves and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service of the United States.

 

Company P Greek Expeditionary Forces Battalion  (Second Award) is cited for extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Surang-NI, Korea during the period 17 June to 18 June 1953.  Assigned the defense of a vital outpost position (Harry), the company encountered a major enemy assault on the evening of June 17.  After an intense concentration of enemy mortar and artillery fire, the hostile forces, which had taken up an attack position on the northeast and northwest side of the outpost ,  moved rapidly  through their  own and friendly artillery fire  to gain a foothold on the northern slope of the position.  Refusing to withdraw, Company  P closed in and met the attackers in a furious hand to hand struggle in which many of the enemy were driven off.   The aggressors regrouped, quickly attacked a second time, and again gained the friendly trenches.  Immediately, the Greek Forces launched a series of counterattacks, simultaneously dispatching a diversionary force to the east of the outpost which successfully channeled the enemy thrusts.  After 2 hours of close in fighting, the aggressors were again routed and the friendly positions restored.  The outstanding conduct and exemplary courage exhibited by members   of Company P,    Greek Expeditionary Forces Battalion,   reflects great credit on themselves and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and the Kingdom of Greece.

General Orders 620, Headquarters Eighth United States Army, 16 September 1954.
Presidential Unit Citation :

Company F, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Division, is cited for outstanding performances of duty and extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Kumwha, Korea (hill 412 across from Outpost Harry), on 10 June 1953. This unit, a member of a combined attacking team, was assigned the mission of assaulting a heavily fortified enemy hill for the purpose of diverting the concentration of communist strength at a nearby strategic point. As the company moved into a forward position it encountered heavy enemy fire from the crest of the hill. While two friendly tanks departed for a point to the left of the objective, a 10-man assault team approached the crest under the support of tank, artillery, and small arms fire. The assault platoon twice placed machine guns on the eastern slope of the hill to cover the advance but these were quickly destroyed by enemy fire. As the assault group engaged the hostile defenders in close combat, the platoon leader was wounded. His men moved back 10 yards, regrouped, and again charged the cave position, killing and critically wounding its occupants with hand grenades. As the assault platoon moved along the southern slope of the ridge in an effort to pinpoint the enemy fire, they were met by intense resistance from a well-entrenched enemy on the reverse slope. Sending word for two support squads to move up, the Company Commander led his unit in a repeated attempt to rush the crest of the hill. Again encountering concentrated enemy fire, the group managed to deploy to the right and left of the eastern end of the ridge to prevent an enemy envelopment. While the platoon made ready a further attempt to capture the reverse slope position, strengthened by the support squads, a squad-leader of the first platoon moved to the forward side of the hill and discovered the location of the enemy emplacements. With this information, the assault elements again moved forward, crossed the ridge, and routed the enemy with hand grenades and small arms fire. The hard-fought positions immediately were occupied and reorganized in time to stem enemy efforts to regain them. The heroism and courage exhibited by members of this unit reflect great credit on themselves, their organization, and the military service of the United States. )

Presidential and other Unit Citations
From the www.army.mil website

 

Lt. Audie L. Murphy
http://www.warfoto.com/AudieMurphy.htm
Most Decorated World War II Combat Soldier

Audie L. Murphy Memorial Website Logo Audie Murphy painting, copyright 2010, Dave Phillips. Used with permission.
www.audiemurphy.com

1audie.jpg (26572 bytes)

Murphy, Audie L.

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Company B 1 5th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Holtzwihr France, 26 January 1945. Entered service at: Dallas, Tex. Birth: Hunt County, near Kingston, Tex. G.O. No.. 65, 9 August 1945. Citation 2d Lt. Murphy commanded Company B, which was attacked by 6 tanks and waves of infantry. 2d Lt. Murphy ordered his men to withdraw to prepared positions in a woods, while he remained forward at his command post and continued to give fire directions to the artillery by telephone. Behind him, to his right, 1 of our tank destroyers received a direct hit and began to burn. Its crew withdrew to the woods. 2d Lt. Murphy continued to direct artillery fire which killed large numbers of the advancing enemy infantry. With the enemy tanks abreast of his position, 2d Lt. Murphy climbed on the burning tank destroyer, which was in danger of blowing up at any moment, and employed its .50 caliber machinegun against the enemy. He was alone and exposed to German fire from 3 sides, but his deadly fire killed dozens of Germans and caused their infantry attack to waver. The enemy tanks, losing infantry support, began to fall back. For an hour the Germans tried every available weapon to eliminate 2d Lt. Murphy, but he continued to hold his position and wiped out a squad which was trying to creep up unnoticed on his right flank. Germans reached as close as 10 yards, only to be mowed down by his fire. He received a leg wound, but ignored it and continued the single-handed fight until his ammunition was exhausted. He then made his way to his company, refused medical attention, and organized the company in a counterattack which forced the Germans to withdraw. His directing of artillery fire wiped out many of the enemy; he killed or wounded about 50. 2d Lt. Murphy's indomitable courage and his refusal to give an inch of ground saved his company from possible encirclement and destruction, and enabled it to hold the woods which had been the enemy's objective.


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He was America's greatest World War II hero, at one point single-handedly holding off 250 German soldiers and six tanks. But despite winning acclaim and stardom, he could never escape the pain and trauma of the conflict that made him a hero.
Through clips from his films, newsreel footage and the memories of those who knew him including his sister the heroic but tragic tale of Audie Murphy comes to life.

  
Click Here for times
To Hell and Back
Audie Murphy, the most decorated soldier in WWII, plays himself in the film version of his military career, which culminates in his receiving the Medal of Honor. With David Janssen. (1955) (Historian: Kenneth Jackson, Professor of History, Columbia University.) [TV PG] 

More 3rd Infantry Division Heroes from WWII


Official 3rd Signal Company Photos
Photo courtesy of Denis Toomey www.dogfacesoldiers.org

Photo courtesy of Rich Heller www.warfoto.com
 

 

 


Sgt. James P. Connor is awarded the Medal of Honor from Seventh Army commander Gen. Patch in Pont a Mousson. Connor was part of a 7th Regiment Battle Patrol that lost a third of its 36 men, including its c.o., before he led them, despite several wounds, to overcome a force of 47 Germans with three machine guns during the assault on Red Beach Aug. 15.

It is with pride that the men of the 3rd Infantry Division point to their record of combat, of campaigns, of landings, and of victories. The route from Casablanca to Berchtesgaden is strewn with the wreckage of the shattered Wehrmacht. Never did the 3rd Infantry Division falter, or fall back in its thirty months of combat. All of this is indeed glorious, and in Army language can be said  to be, "...in keeping with the highest traditions of the service."*
* From 'The History of the Third Infantry Division in World War II' 1947,1999 Battery Press'

 


3rd Infantry Division
Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients

Click Here to go to http://www.medalofhonor.com/3rdDivision.htm
for a list of the 3rd Infantry Division Medal of Honor Recipients
Also the history, facts, other information, and other Medal of Honor Recipients
http://www.medalofhonor.com/

 

Headstone of Sylvester Antolak in Italian Cemetery

Antolak, Sylvester

Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company B, 15th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Cisterna di Littoria, Italy, 24 May 1944. Entered service at: St. Clairsville, Ohio. Birth: St. Clairsville, Ohio. G.O. No.: 89, 19 October 1945. Citation: Near Cisterna di Littoria, Italy, he charged 200 yards over flat, coverless terrain to destroy an enemy machinegun nest during the second day of the offensive which broke through the German cordon of steel around the Anzio beachhead. Fully 30 yards in advance of his squad, he ran into withering enemy machinegun, machine-pistol and rifle fire. Three times he was struck by bullets and knocked to the ground, but each time he struggled to his feet to continue his relentless advance. With one shoulder deeply gashed and his right arm shattered, he continued to rush directly into the enemy fire concentration with his submachinegun wedged under his uninjured arm until within 15 yards of the enemy strong point, where he opened fire at deadly close range, killing 2 Germans and forcing the remaining 10 to surrender. He reorganized his men and, refusing to seek medical attention so badly needed, chose to lead the way toward another strong point 100 yards distant. Utterly disregarding the hail of bullets concentrated upon him, he had stormed ahead nearly three-fourths of the space between strong points when he was instantly killed by hostile enemy fire. Inspired by his example, his squad went on to overwhelm the enemy troops. By his supreme sacrifice, superb fighting courage, and heroic devotion to the attack, Sgt. Antolak was directly responsible for eliminating 20 Germans, capturing an enemy machinegun, and clearing the path for his company to advance.


 On June 21, 2000, at a Presentation Ceremony held in Washington D.C.,  
21 veterans had their Distinguished Service Crosses upgraded to Medals of Honor. 
One of these is the Third Division's own, Rudolph B. Davila of Vista, California. 

STAFF SERGEANT RUDOLPH B. DAVILA  
UNITED STATES ARMY

Second Lieutenant Rudolph B. Davila distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action on 28 May 1944, near Artena, Italy. During the offensive that broke through the German mountain strongholds surrounding the Anzio beachhead, (then) Staff Sergeant Davila risked death to provide heavy weapons support for a beleaguered rifle company. Caught on an exposed hillside by heavy fire from a well-entrenched enemy force, his machine gunners were reluctant to risk putting their guns into action. 

Crawling 50 yards to the nearest machine gun, Staff Sergeant Davila opened fire on the enemy. In 
order to observe the effect of his fire, Sergeant Davila fired from the kneeling position ignoring the enemy fire that struck his tripod and passed between his legs. Ordering a gunner to take over, he crawled forward to a 
vantage point and directed the firefight with hand and arm signals until both hostile machine guns were silenced. 

Bringing his three remaining machine guns into action, he drove the enemy to a reserve position 200 yards to the rear. When he received a painful wound in the leg, he dashed to a burned tank and, despite the crash of bullets on the hull, engaged a second enemy force from its turret. Dismounting, he advanced 130 yards in short rushes,  crawled 20 yards and charged into an enemy-held house to eliminate the defending force of five with a hand grenade and rifle fire. 

Climbing to the  attic, he straddled a large shell hole in the wall and opened fire on the 
enemy. Although the walls of the house were crumbling, he continued to fire 
until he had destroyed two more machine guns. 

His intrepid actions brought desperately needed heavy weapons support to a hard-pressed rifle company and 
silenced four machine gunners, forcing the enemy to abandon their prepared positions. 

Staff Sergeant Davila's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.

RUDOLPH DAVILA PASSES AWAY
MOH Recipient Rudolph Davila passed away January 26, 2002. Staff Sergeant 
Davila led a charge against the mountain strongholds of the Germans that 
overlooked the Anzio beachhead in WWII. Despite the lack of cover and a 
painfully wounded leg he succeeded against great odds.

Davila, Rudolph B.

Staff Sergeant Rudolph B. Davila distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action, on 28 May 1944, near Artena, Italy. During the offensive which broke through the German mountain strongholds surrounding the Anzio beachhead, Staff Sergeant Davila risked death to provide heavy weapons support for a beleaguered rifle company. Caught on an exposed hillside by heavy, grazing fire from a well-entrenched German force, his machine gunners were reluctant to risk putting their guns into action. Crawling fifty yards to the nearest machine gun, Staff Sergeant Davila set it up alone and opened fire on the enemy. In order to observe the effect of his fire, Sergeant Davila fired from the kneeling position, ignoring the enemy fire that struck the tripod and passed between his legs. Ordering a gunner to take over, he crawled forward to a vantage point and directed the firefight with hand and arm signals until both hostile machine guns were silenced. Bringing his three remaining machine guns into action, he drove the enemy to a reserve position two hundred yards to the rear. When he received a painful wound in the leg, he dashed to a burned tank and, despite the crash of bullets on the hull, engaged a second enemy force from the tanks turret. Dismounting, he advanced 130 yards in short rushes, crawled 20 yards and charged into an enemy-held house to eliminate the defending force of five with a hand grenade and rifle fire. Climbing to the attic, he straddled a large shell hole in the wall and opened fire on the enemy. Although the walls of the house were crumbling, he continued to fire until he had destroyed two more machine guns. His intrepid actions brought desperately needed heavy weapons support to a hard-pressed rifle company and silenced four machine gunners, which forced the enemy to abandon their prepared positions. Staff Sergeant Davilas extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.


Frank Zalewski

Thanks to the determined efforts of Walter Tatko, Frank Zalewski is about to be recognized by the Legion of Valor of the United States of America.

The Legion of Valor, created by an Act of Congress in 1955, recognizes those members of our Armed Forces who have been awarded the Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross or the Air Force Cross.

For actions on 27 August 1944, near Bergude, France, both Frank Zalewski and Walter Tatko of Company A of the 30th Infantry Regiment of the 3rd Division, were awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Subsequently, Pfc Zalewski was killed in action on 27 September 1944. He lies, along with other brave men in the Epinal American Cemetery in Epinal, France.

Unfortunately, due to the absence of a copy of the General Orders awarding Pfc Zalewski the DSC, he was denied admission to the Legion. This has been corrected and he will receive his long overdue recognition.
The following letter, from the Adjutant of the Legion, speaks for itself. Another member of the 3rd Division, a Division filled with brave men, will at last receive the recognition he so justly deserves.
ROCK OF THE MARNE,

Michael Wells
Proud Son of the 3rd

LEGION OF VALOR
OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INC.
FOUNDED AS MEDAL OF HONOR LEGION-1890
CHARTERED BY ACT OF CONGRESS 1955

April 10, 2004
Mr. Walter A. Tatko
4332 Salmon St.
Philadelphia, PA 19137-1602
Dear Walter:
     The words of Tom Brokaw's come to my mind as I read your buddy's Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) citation. Frank was one of THE GREAT MEN in the "greatest generation".

Few Private First Class soldiers are the recipient of the DSC and you can be justly proud of yours and his extraordinary heroism in saving your platoon of men from death or capture on 27 August 1944. It is just tragic that he was killed in a later action.
 
There is no need for you to send the Legion of Valor anything. You have done enough.
You might, however, take me up on the suggestion I put in the March-April General Orders on page four. The LOV history booklet is very interesting and I am sure you would enjoy reading it. I know whatever you send to the Legion of Valor Museum Foundation will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you for your research work on Frank. I will be writing him up in a future issue of the General Orders and the citation will then be placed on the website.
Sincerely,
Philip J. Conran, AFC
Colonel USAF (Ret)
National Adjutant

 

Belated Honor to T/Sgt. James McHarg

I would like to bring this to your attention in the hope that you will report this to other members of the 30th through the Friscan Reporter.
Thanks to the determined efforts of Jack Sneddon, a member of Company A of the 30th, T/Sgt James J. McHarg, Company A of the 30th, will finally receive his just recognition.
T/Sgt McHarg, who was Killed In Action on April 28th 1945, will be inducted into the Hall of Valor of the Soldiers & Sailors National Military Museum & Memorial in Pittsburgh with a dinner/ceremony on March 6th 2004.
T/Sgt McHarg was awarded the 2nd Cluster to his Silver Star posthumously on the 28th of September 1945. This award accompanies his Bronze Star with Cluster and 2 Purple Hearts. His deeds and sacrifice are typical of those who have come to be know as the "Greatest Generation".
The debt that is owed to the members of this "generation" can never be repaid, only acknowledged and honored. This acknowledgement of T/Sgt McHarg, though long overdue, should be cause for all of us to give thanks, each in his or her own way, for the deeds and sacrifice of all those who have served and continue to serve Our Country in the cause of Freedom. We live today in Freedom because of what they have done and continue to do. GOD BLESS THEM AND GOD BLESS AMERICA!

OUR COUNTRY, NOT OURSELVES,
Mike Wells
Proud Son of the 3rd

 

Capt. Russ Cloer

Captain Russ Cloer
Capt., I & R Platoon Leader, 7th Inf.,
3rd Inf. Div., VI Corp., 7th Army, US Army

 

Department of the Army
U.S. Total Army Personnel Command
Alexandria, VA 22332-0471

Permanent Orders 235-6 23 August 2002


RICHARDS, GEORGE E. RA 065 883 First Lieutenant, Company K,
 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, Republic of Korea

Award: Bronze Star Medal with "V" Device for Valor (Posthumous)
Date(s): 10 June to 11 June 1953
Authority: AR 600-8-22, Paragraph 3-13
Reason: For heroism in ground combat
BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE ARMY
ROBERT L. WHITE, JR. LTC, AG Chief Military Awards Branch

For heroic achievement in action against the enemy on the night of 10-11 June
1953, during the successful defense of Outpost Harry in the Republic of
Korea. While under a massive barrage of high explosive rounds from Chinese
Communists Forces, Lieutenant Richards inspired his men to fortify the
company's hill position in anticipation of a forthcoming assault by a
reinforced regiment of Chinese Infantry. In spite of the company's defensive
fire, the enemy reached the trenches. Lieutenant Richards sounded the alarm
and without regard for his personal safety, engaged the enemy in close
combat, killing several with deadly carbine fire. He held the enemy at bay
long enough for the forward observer to request friendly artillery to open
fire on their own position. An enemy grenade severely wounded Lieutenant
Richards, rendering him unconscious and was subsequently killed by an enemy
soldier. Lieutenant Richard's self-sacrifice helped to ensure that Outpost
Harry remained in the hands of the United States Eighth Army. His unflinching
courage and good cheer in the face of overwhelming odds was an inspiration to
his soldiers and in the highest traditions of military service and reflects
great credit upon himself, the 15th Infantry Regiment and the United States Army.

Contributed by Martin Markley

From the Defense Department
The issuance of a Cold War Service Medal is under review by the
Department of Defense.  We understand that a decision will be made in about
2 months.  When the decision is made we will post a News Release at our
"NEWS" web page at http://www.defenselink.mil/news/

Directorate for Public Inquiry and Analysis
(
Courtesy of John Parmenter of the Wildflecken Veterans for this note.)

 

Notice in the Korean War Project website
4. Bravery Gold Medal of Greece for Colors of 3rd Inf Div
==========================================================

This notice is a bit late in announcement:
The following was provided by Pat Scarpato via Martin Markley (15th IR):


Chryssoun Aristion Andrias (Bravery Gold Medal of Greece), Streamer 
embroidered KOREA Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Infantry 
Division, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Brigade, 3d 
Infantry Division 

Cited Department of the Army General Orders 2, 2 February 1956 (along 
with attached units): 

In accordance with the Royal Order dated 15 June 1955 

CHRYSSOUN ARISTION ANDRIAS (BRAVERY GOLD MEDAL) 

is awarded to the Colors of the 3d Infantry Division U.S. Army because, 
during the long period of the war in Korea, the above unit positioned 
together with the Greek Expeditionary Forces, with which the latter was 
assigned, took part in the hard fought battles in which the fluidity and 
the maneuvers experienced by the American and Greek soldiers, who 
falling together in the field of honour, won battles and succeeded the 
final victory, defending their colors, and the Freedom of Humanity

 

Award of Bronze Star Medal 
with "V" Device to Lux Army Korean War Vet
RECOMMENDATION FOR THE SILVER STAR
                        

     Luxembourg Army Corporal Raymond Beringer, serial number L/310903, distinguished himself by selfless, heroic action while serving as chief of a heavy machine gun team, heavy weapons company, Belgian (B.U.N.C.) Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division.  The Belgian Battalion was deployed in defensive positions along the "White Horse Mountain Line" east of the village of Chatkol as the 3rd Infantry Division's far right element adjacent to the Republic of Korea's 9th Infantry Division.  

During the night of 7-8 April 1953, Chinese Communist forces launched a bitter assault to penetrate the United Nations' lines.  Initial enemy successes swept back the forward positioned outposts and threatened to break through the battalion's right flank.  On his own initiative and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Corporal Beringer single-handedly relocated his heavy, water-cooled, .30 caliber machine gun from the protected confines of his bunker to an exposed position on top of it so as to have a better field of fire.  Despite heavy mortar and artillery shelling, which was pinning down his fellow comrades, Corporal Beringer delivered accurate and crippling fire for several hours into the waves of assaulting Chinese troops, estimated to be of regimental strength. His determination and coolness under fire blunted the enemy attack and was crucial to the successful defense of the battalion's exposed flank.  

Following the engagement upwards of twenty dead and wounded enemy were found within 200 meters of his bunker. At the time of this action Cpl Beringer was an extended volunteer, his mandatory tour of duty having expired three months earlier, when the Luxembourg contingent returned home.  

In
recognition of his heroic feat, he was cited in the official Belgian dispatch of 22 April 1953 by his battalion commander, and promoted to the rank of sergeant.  His company commander advised him that he was being recommended for a valor decoration, and gave him the choice of an Belgian or American award.  He chose the latter, but apparently the paperwork never reached US channels. 

The only US awards Cpl Beringer ever received were the Korean Campaign Medal and the Combat Infantry Badge.  He served in Korea a total of 24 months, from 27 February 1952 to 25 February 1954.  In August 1992, upon confirmation that no official records existed in US Army files concerning his recommendation for the Silver Star, he was presented a "certificate" signed by Secretary of the Army Stone commending his combat service in the Korean War.


murl3a.jpg (47458 bytes)

Lt. General Alexander M. Patch awards 
1st Lieutenant, G. Murl Conner,
the Distinguished Service Cross, Feb. 10, 1945
for extraordinary heroism in action
on January 24, 1945 near Houssen, France
.

The following is a portion of a letter written to W. H. Ramsey by his son, Lt. Col. Lloyd B. Ramsey, (now retired Maj. Gen. Lloyd B. Ramsey, who resides in Arlington, Virginia) commanding 3rd. bn., 3rd Div., 7th Inf., 7th Army, General Patch commanding. 
"I just sent one of my officers home. He was my S-2 (Intelligence Officer), Lt. Garlin M. Conner, who is from Aaron, Kentucky. I'm really proud of Lt. Conner. He probably will call you and, if he does, he may not sound like a soldier, will sound like any good old country boy, but, to my way of seeing, he's one of the outstanding soldiers of this war, if not the outstanding. 

He was a Sergeant until July and now is a First Lieutenant. He has the D.S.C., which could have been, I believe, a Congressional Medal of Honor but, he was heading home and we wanted to get him the highest award possible, before he left. He has a Silver Star with 4 clusters, a Bronze Star, Purple Heart with 6 clusters and is in for a French medal. On this last push, within two weeks he earned the D.S.C., a cluster to his Silver Star and a Bronze Star. 
I've never seen a man with as much courage and ability as he has. I usually don't brag much on my
officers but, this is one officer nobody could brag enough about and do him justice; he's a real soldier." 

 

  BATTLE CAMPAIGNS

WORLD WAR I

AISNE   CHAMPANGE
MARNE 
ST. MIHIEL
MEUSE-ARGONNE

Medals of Honor-2

 

WORLD WAR II

ALGERIA - FRENCH MOROCCO  TUNISIA  SICILY  NAPLES -FOGGIA  ANZIO  ROME - ARNO 
SOUTHERN FRANCE  ARDENNES AISACE  RHINELAND
CENTRAL EUROPE

Medals of Honor-37

 

KOREAN WAR

CCF INTERVENTION
1ST UN COUNTEROFFENSIVE
CCF SPRING OFFENSIVE 
UN SUMMER -FALL OFFENSIVE 
2ND KOREAN WINTER
KOREA SUMMER - FALL 1952
3RD KOREAN WINTER 
KOREA SUMMER - FALL 1953

Medals of Honor-11

 

Global War on Terror: Iraq

Medal of Honor-1

 
Operation New Dawn

 

Operations within the Campaigns
Compiled by the Bureaucrats in the Military
(For an explanation read the 3ID historians paragraph below)
The infield fly rule makes more sense!

The reason for this is because an operation and a campaign are two different things. For the purposes of this message, an Operation is named by a unit, like the 3ID naming "Operation Marne Avalanche", or by someone in DOD who at the beginning of the conflict called it "Operation Iraqi Freedom". A campaign, on the other hand, one that will be listed on a unit's lineage and honors, is named by a specific DOD organization, the Military Awards Branch (telephone number is 703-325-8700) well after the campaign has begun and usually after it has ended. Each campaign has certain criteria: time limitations, combat zone area, percentage of a unit that must be in the area at the appropriate time for the unit to get the campaign credit, etc. (For example, the Sicily campaign in WWII has a time limitation of 9 July 1943 for ground troops to 17 August 1943 and the combat zone was Sicily and adjacent waters. Any unit that arrived in Sicily after 17 August 43 did not get credit for that campaign. The War Department published the campaign names, geographical and time limits, and names of units receiving for the campaign credit in a GO months after the campaign was over.)
Only the bullets were real!

Peacekeeping Service

 

Germany

 

Bosnia

 

DEFENSE OF SAUDI ARABIA  
LIBERATION AND DEFENSE OF KUWAIT
(Also known as Desert Storm, Desert Shield and the Gulf War)

 

Operation IRAQI Freedom I

 

Operation IRAQI Freedom  III

 

Operation IRAQI Freedom  2007-11

 
Operation New Dawn - 2012

 

67 years ago, men of the 3rd Infantry Division captured Berchtesgaden. Let us raise our glasses in a toast to all those who did not make it home and to those who did but have since left us and to those still with us and those still protecting our freedom. 
In the words of Joe Fournier, Sr. "Lest we forget". HEROES ALL!
ROCK OF THE MARNE,

This photo of General O'Daniel, General Leclerc de Hauteclocque, and Lieutenant De Valence was most certainly taken in Berchtesgaden on May 5, 1945.

 
Leclerc : ''Why, General, are you refusing to let my Combat Command cross which has been held back by this for an hour?"

O'Daniel : "Because, General, first you are not on your march axis/route and because second, those are my Engineers who have thrown the bridge on the river and in consequence your element will only cross it when my troops will be on the other side."

The 3rd I.D turned right for Berchtesgaden and arrived first. The French followed and primarily went to the train station where they found Goering's train with goods and secret papers on the V1/V2 which were later sent to France.

Go to http://www.warfoto.com/berchesg.htm for complete description AND photographs of the capture of Berchtesgaden, French and American versions.

 


The Descending Curtain:
Salzburg 

(A History of Berchtesgaden)
Lloyd B. Ramsey, MG Ret.
Reprinted from "The Watch on the Rhine" of November 1998  


The 3rd Infantry Division raises the Stars and Stripes at Obersalzberg, above Berchtesgaden. The flag is raised by Pvt. Bennet A. Walker and Pfc. Nick Urich of the 3rd Division's, 7th Infantry after capture of the village.

Gen. Ramsey (Then Col.) was the Ex. O. of the 7th Inf. Reg. under Col. Heintges during this last campaign.

 He writes: Lt. Col. Jack Duncan had sent out a patrol during the night to locate bridges and they found nothing. Col. Heintges sent me, his Ex. O., to see Col. Duncan. We both talked to the patrol and were convinced they did not proceed far enough. Duncan & myself, along with a large patrol, found the bridge over the Saalach river, with a locomotive dropped between the tracks.
 
General O'Daniel and Col. Heintges placed me in charge of the bridge with Lt. White as my assistant. Gen. O'Daniel told me in person that no one was to cross that bridge except 3rd Infantry without his personal approval to me direct.  
  
    Gen Le Clerc sent tanks to cross the bridge before he arrived. I saw them coming & commandeered a 2 1/2 truck & placed it across the road at the bridge. When Gen. Le Clerc arrived, I met him and he told me that he had seen Gen. O'Daniel and the Gen. told him he could cross the bridge. I informed the General that Gen. O'Daniel told me that he must give me such orders in person. Gen. Le Clerc left to find Gen. O'Daniel.

Soon Gen. O'Daniel appeared at the bridge. I asked him if he had told Gen Le Clerc that he could cross the bridge.

His answer was "Yes - But you did not let him through did you".

I answered, "No - You had given me specific instructions."

His comment, " It's a goddam good thing that you did not let him through."  

   I was at the raising of the U.S. flag over Berchtesgaden on 5, May 1945 on the right of Col. Heintges in the picture on page 17, Oct., Watch. The French were in Berchtesgaden at that time and Col. Heintges had a very difficult time with the French, trying to get them to agree that we could raise the flag. Their point was that this was their objective and not the 3rd Inf. Division's. 

 The picture you see is as high as the French would let us fly the flag. It was removed after the ceremony.  
  
Editor's note: Isadore L. Valenti, Medic in K Co 7th Reg. 3rd Infantry Division, writes in his just released book "Combat Medic". In the chapter entitled, "The Theft of Berchtesgaden" an exciting account of the above events is given.
Isadore is a retired High School principal.

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