History,Symbols and Traditions of the 3rd Infantry Division

 

3RD INFANTRY DIVISION (MECHANIZED)
History, Symbols and Traditions


Last Update March 30, 2016

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A Condensed History of the 3rd Infantry Division Memorial in Chateau-Thierry

By Society Historian Tim Stoy

                In October 1955 Captain, retired, Frederick Winant, DSC, WWI was appointed Chairman of the Memorial Committee which included national officers of the Society, the Division Commander, the Honorable Patrick J. Hurley, General Lucian K. Truscott (ret.), MG Thomas J. Cross (ret.), COL Eugene Salet, Major John S.D. Eisenhower, John C. Cattus, and J.R. Henneman.  Winant and Cattus represented WWI veterans, MG Cross and COL Salet WWII veterans, and Major Eisenhower Korean War veterans.  The committee was charged with exploring the offer of the Mayor of Chateau-Thierry to restore the original Third Division Memorial on a new site along the Marne River.  The undamaged portions of the memorial had been stored by the city since its destruction in 1940. The French Army demolished the bridge in Chateau-Thierry in an attempt to stop German forces from crossing the Marne River and the blast destroyed the memorial standing adjacent to the northern end of the bridge. 

                At the annual reunion held in Washington, DC in July 1956 the committee was authorized to accept the Mayor’s offer and in 1957 MG Cross (a WWI veteran of the 7th Infantry Regiment and 3ID CG in the Korean War) approved the site location on behalf of the Society during a visit to Chateau-Thierry.  This was subsequently approved by the membership during the July 1957 reunion in Indianapolis.

                The deployment of the 3rd Infantry Division to Germany in 1958 added impetus to the project. The active division sent representatives to discuss the memorial with Chateau-Thierry city officials.  Architects were engaged to estimate the costs of re-erecting the original WWI memorial - $40,000.00. This estimate served as basis for the city’s claim for reparations from the French government for the destruction of the original memorial.   Concurrrently, the architects were asked to prepare cost estimates for a less expensive memorial.  The French government granted the city $10,000.00 in response to the damage claim. 

                By April of 1960 the architects had produced an estimate of $12-15,000.00 for a new memorial, envisioning inclusion of some of the stone from the original in its construction.  This later proved impracticable and the disposition of the remains of the old memorial is lost to history.  The design was approved by the American Battle Monuments Commission on 14 October 1960 and the Fine Arts Commission on 19 October 1960. 

                The cost estimate rose to $18,000.00 which included establishment of a permanent maintenance fund.  French reparations worked out to $9,900.00 due to exchange rate fluctuations and the Society started a campaign in February 1961 to raise an additional $9,000.00.  By April 1961 $8,600.00 had been raised through contributions from the active Division and Society members.  Further minor revisions to the design were required by the Beaux Arts Commission in Paris. 

                The Memorial was dedicated on 8 October 1961 with the CG of the 3rd Infantry Division, MG William W. Dick, Jr.; MG Eagles (ret.) and Mr. Ben Norton, President Society of the 3rd Infantry Division, as the US speakers and the Mayor of Chateau-Thierry, the Prefét of the Department of the Aisne, and the President of the Association of Anciens Combattants as the French speakers at the ceremony.   The active division participated with an honor guard, color guard, and the division band. 

                Shortly after the dedication, the Society established the maintenance fund to ensure long term viability of the memorial.  The 3rd Infantry Division contributed $500.00 to the fund which initially totaled $2,060.55.  In 1963 the money was deposited with the Perpetual Building Association of Washington, DC.  Dividends would be mailed annually to the American Battle Monuments Commission for a specific trust account to maintain the memorial.  The Memorial Committee was discharged, having accomplished its mission.  Captain Winant remained co-Trustee of the maintenance fund, working in tandem with a trustee appointed by the American Battle Monuments Commission.

                The final financial statement for the memorial project was:  Contributions - $5,383.50 from Society Members, $5,069.66 from the Active Division; Reparations - $9,900.67; Transfer from original WWI Monument Fund – $562.50; Sale of Dedication Record - $275.00.  Total receipts: $21,696.33.  Disbursements:  $18,752.70 – Monument construction; $808.00 – Dedication ceremony expenses; $75.00 – Auditing expenses; $2,060.55 – Maintenance Fund. Total disbursements: $21,696.33.

                The city agreed to conduct basic maintenance of the grounds and the flowers/shrubbery while long term repair and preservation of the monument remained with the Society.  It was determined the memorial’s reflecting pool was too expensive and it was converted to a flower bed in 1970. 

                On 27 January 1978 the Memorial Fund was transferred to McLean Savings and Loan Association with a value of $2,178.42. Regular withdrawals were made to fund repairs and maintenance on the memorial, with occasional appeals to the membership to help restock the fund.  Captain Carl Swickerath, retired, replaced Captain Winant as co-trustee in 1967 and stated in 1989 that all memorial maintenance through the end of 1988 had been paid through the fund and interest accrued over time. 

                In 1988 the American Battle Monuments Commission informed the active duty division the memorial required $4,850.00 in repairs to remain viable.  The division commander contacted the Society, offering $500.00 to assist in the memorial’s maintenance.  Society leadership voted to ask ABMC to assume responsibility for the memorial and asked Captain Swickerath to serve as a committee of one to explore the possibility.  Concurrently Mike Halik was asked by Society leadership to research the history of the memorial and to determine its ownership.  He was unable to locate any legal documents indicating official ownership.  ABMC declined to assume responsibility for the memorial and its maintenance remains the responsibility of the Society.  At the time the Society was providing funds to help build the Korean War Veterans Memorial and working on the Division monument in Arlington National Cemetery; there was not a great deal of money available to work on the Division’s oldest memorial.  The Society later paid around $5,000.00 in 2000 for repairs. 

                De facto owner of the Memorial is the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division.  The American Battle Monuments Commission considers the memorial to be the Society’s responsibility, and has periodically over the past 25 years reminded the Society of ABMC’s power to have deteriorating monuments/memorials overseas torn down.  Chateau-Thierry owns the land and continues to pay for landscaping and flowers.  The city has included the memorial in its periodic cleaning of its memorials, but all major work performed in the 51 years since its construction and dedication have been paid for by the Society, with occasional contributions from the active duty division. 

                The original memorial was built with money donated by the members of the 3rd Division serving on occupation duty in Germany in 1919 (information from the Watch on the Rhine May and August 1919).  The fund raising drive collected 492369.00 Reichsmarks from officers and men of the division as of 15 August 1919, with a further 25,000.00 Reichsmarks donated by the Knights of Columbus.  Exchange rate was 32.85 RM to the dollar in 1919.  The estimated cost of the memorial was $25,000.00. The memorial dedication took place on 9 August 1919 with Major General Robert L. Howze laying the foundation stone.  The memorial was completed in 1927 and the first official Society visit to the memorial was in 1929 on a reunion tour to the Division’s WWI battlefields.

                Any members who may have files on either of the 3ID Memorials in Chateau-Thierry are asked to copy and share them with the historian.  There is no file in the Society archives on the original WWI Memorial, with all information in this article being gleaned from a review of the Watch on the Rhine and correspondence with Mike Halik and John Shirley.
Dedication of the 3ID Memorial at Chateau Thierry
As Published in the December 1961 Watch on the Rhine
Click on photos for enlarged view

 


The Rock of the Marne Speech of May 1, 1920
Donated by Ray Heddleson 1Sgt U. S. Army (Ret) of Spring Hill, Florida



 

Fort Stewart Museum
Bldg T904, 2022 Frank Cochran Drive
Fort Stewart, GA 31314
Museum Hours: 10 a.m. to 4 .m, Tuesday - Saturday
Closed Sundays, Mondays and Federal Holidays

Contact the Fort Stewart Museum Curator to schedule a personal or tour group visit!

For information on the 3rd Infantry Division contact:
Walter W. Meeks, III
Curator, Fort Stewart Museum
1-912-767-7885
walter.meeks@us.army.mil

 

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Essebagger, John Jr.

Rank and organization: Corporal, U.S. Army, Company A, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Popsudong, Korea, 25 April 1951. Entered service at: Holland, Mich. Born: 29 October 1928, Holland, Mich. G.O. No.: 61, 24 April 1952. Citation: Cpl. Essebagger, a member of Company A, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. Committed to effect a delaying action to cover the 3d Battalion's withdrawal through Company A, Cpl. Essebagger, a member of 1 of 2 squads maintaining defensive positions in key terrain and defending the company's right flank, had participated in repulsing numerous attacks. In a frenzied banzai charge the numerically superior enemy seriously threatened the security of the planned route of withdrawal and isolation of the small force. Badly shaken, the grossly outnumbered detachment started to fall back and Cpl. Essebagger, realizing the impending danger, voluntarily remained to provide security for the withdrawal. Gallantly maintaining a l-man stand, Cpl. Essebagger raked the menacing hordes with crippling fire and, with the foe closing on the position, left the comparative safety of his shelter and advanced in the face of overwhelming odds, firing his weapon and hurling grenades to disconcert the enemy and afford time for displacement of friendly elements to more tenable positions. Scorning the withering fire and bursting shells, Cpl. Essebagger continued to move forward, inflicting destruction upon the fanatical foe until he was mortally wounded. Cpl. Essebagger's intrepid action and supreme sacrifice exacted a heavy toll in enemy dead and wounded, stemmed the onslaught, and enabled the retiring squads to reach safety. His valorous conduct and devotion to duty reflected lasting glory upon himself and was in keeping with the noblest traditions of the infantry and the U.S. Army.

 

Gilliland, Charles L.

Rank and organization: Corporal (then Pfc.), U.S. Army, Company I, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Tongmang-ni, Korea, 25 April 1951. Entered service at: Yellville (Marion County), Ark. Born: 24 May 1933, Mountain Home, Ark. G.O. No.: 2, 11 January 1955. Citation: Cpl. Gilliland, a member of Company I, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. A numerically superior hostile force launched a coordinated assault against his company perimeter, the brunt of which was directed up a defile covered by his automatic rifle. His assistant was killed by enemy fire but Cpl. Gilliland, facing the full force of the assault, poured a steady fire into the foe which stemmed the onslaught. When 2 enemy soldiers escaped his raking fire and infiltrated the sector, he leaped from his foxhole, overtook and killed them both with his pistol. Sustaining a serious head wound in this daring exploit, he refused medical attention and returned to his emplacement to continue his defense of the vital defile. His unit was ordered back to new defensive positions but Cpl. Gilliland volunteered to remain to cover the withdrawal and hold the enemy at bay. His heroic actions and indomitable devotion to duty prevented the enemy from completely overrunning his company positions. Cpl. Gilliland's incredible valor and supreme sacrifice reflect lasting glory upon himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the military service.

 


April 24, 2008

 

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Gibson, Eric G.

Rank and organization. Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Isola Bella, Italy, 28 January 1944. Entered service at: Chicago, Ill. Birth: Nysund, Sweden. G.O. No.: 74, 11 September 1944. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. On 28 January 1944, near Isola Bella, Italy, Tech. 5th Grade Gibson, company cook, led a squad of replacements through their initial baptism of fire, destroyed four enemy positions, killed 5 and captured 2 German soldiers, and secured the left flank of his company during an attack on a strongpoint. Placing himself 50 yards in front of his new men, Gibson advanced down the wide stream ditch known as the Fossa Femminamorta, keeping pace with the advance of his company. An enemy soldier allowed Tech. 5th Grade Gibson to come within 20 yards of his concealed position and then opened fire on him with a machine pistol. Despite the stream of automatic fire which barely missed him, Gibson charged the position, firing his submachine gun every few steps. Reaching the position, Gibson fired pointblank at his opponent, killing him. An artillery concentration fell in and around the ditch; the concussion from one shell knocked him flat. As he got to his feet Gibson was fired on by two soldiers armed with a machine pistol and a rifle from a position only 75 yards distant. Gibson immediately raced toward the foe. Halfway to the position a machinegun opened fire on him. Bullets came within inches of his body, yet Gibson never paused in his forward movement. He killed one and captured the other soldier. Shortly after, when he was fired upon by a heavy machinegun 200 yards down the ditch, Gibson crawled back to his squad and ordered it to lay down a base of fire while he flanked the emplacement. Despite all warning, Gibson crawled 125 yards through an artillery concentration and the cross fire of 2 machineguns which showered dirt over his body, threw 2 hand grenades into the emplacement and charged it with his submachine gun, killing 2 of the enemy and capturing a third. Before leading his men around a bend in the stream ditch, Gibson went forward alone to reconnoiter. Hearing an exchange of machine pistol and submachine gun fire, Gibson's squad went forward to find that its leader had run 35 yards toward an outpost, killed the machine pistol man, and had himself been killed while firing at the Germans.

 

Murphy, Audie L.

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Company B 1 5th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Holtzwihr France, 26 January 1945. Entered service at: Dallas, Tex. Birth: Hunt County, near Kingston, Tex. G.O. No.. 65, 9 August 1945. Citation 2d Lt. Murphy commanded Company B, which was attacked by 6 tanks and waves of infantry. 2d Lt. Murphy ordered his men to withdraw to prepared positions in a woods, while he remained forward at his command post and continued to give fire directions to the artillery by telephone. Behind him, to his right, 1 of our tank destroyers received a direct hit and began to burn. Its crew withdrew to the woods. 2d Lt. Murphy continued to direct artillery fire which killed large numbers of the advancing enemy infantry. With the enemy tanks abreast of his position, 2d Lt. Murphy climbed on the burning tank destroyer, which was in danger of blowing up at any moment, and employed its .50 caliber machinegun against the enemy. He was alone and exposed to German fire from 3 sides, but his deadly fire killed dozens of Germans and caused their infantry attack to waver. The enemy tanks, losing infantry support, began to fall back. For an hour the Germans tried every available weapon to eliminate 2d Lt. Murphy, but he continued to hold his position and wiped out a squad which was trying to creep up unnoticed on his right flank. Germans reached as close as 10 yards, only to be mowed down by his fire. He received a leg wound, but ignored it and continued the single-handed fight until his ammunition was exhausted. He then made his way to his company, refused medical attention, and organized the company in a counterattack which forced the Germans to withdraw. His directing of artillery fire wiped out many of the enemy; he killed or wounded about 50. 2d Lt. Murphy's indomitable courage and his refusal to give an inch of ground saved his company from possible encirclement and destruction, and enabled it to hold the woods which had been the enemy's objective.

 

Murray, Charles P. Jr.

Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Company C, 30th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Kaysersberg, France, 16 December 1944. Entered service at: Wilmington, N.C. Birth: Baltimore, Md. G.O. No.: 63, 1 August 1945. Citation: For commanding Company C, 30th Infantry, displaying supreme courage and heroic initiative near Kaysersberg, France, on 16 December 1944, while leading a reinforced platoon into enemy territory. Descending into a valley beneath hilltop positions held by our troops, he observed a force of 200 Germans pouring deadly mortar, bazooka, machinegun, and small arms fire into an American battalion occupying the crest of the ridge. The enemy's position in a sunken road, though hidden from the ridge, was open to a flank attack by 1st Lt. Murray's patrol but he hesitated to commit so small a force to battle with the superior and strongly disposed enemy. Crawling out ahead of his troops to a vantage point, he called by radio for artillery fire. His shells bracketed the German force, but when he was about to correct the range his radio went dead. He returned to his patrol, secured grenades and a rifle to launch them and went back to his self-appointed outpost. His first shots disclosed his position; the enemy directed heavy fire against him as he methodically fired his missiles into the narrow defile. Again he returned to his patrol. With an automatic rifle and ammunition, he once more moved to his exposed position. Burst after burst he fired into the enemy, killing 20, wounding many others, and completely disorganizing its ranks, which began to withdraw. He prevented the removal of 3 German mortars by knocking out a truck. By that time a mortar had been brought to his support. 1st Lt. Murray directed fire of this weapon, causing further casualties and confusion in the German ranks. Calling on his patrol to follow, he then moved out toward his original objective, possession of a bridge and construction of a roadblock. He captured 10 Germans in foxholes. An eleventh, while pretending to surrender, threw a grenade which knocked him to the ground, inflicting 8 wounds. Though suffering and bleeding profusely, he refused to return to the rear until he had chosen the spot for the block and had seen his men correctly deployed. By his single-handed attack on an overwhelming force and by his intrepid and heroic fighting, 1st Lt. Murray stopped a counterattack, established an advance position against formidable odds, and provided an inspiring example for the men of his command.

 

 

A look back in history from the Frontline Ft. Stewart newspaper


Maj. Gen. James C. Riley. Division Commander and Martin Markley of the 3ID Society,
lay a wreath at the "Rock of the Marne," honoring 3rd Inf. Div. (M) soldiers who gave their lives

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History of the 3d Infantry Division (Mechanized)
"ROCK OF THE MARNE!"

The 3rd Division (re-designated as the 3rd Infantry Division August 1, 1942) was constituted November 12, 1917 in the Regular Army and organized at Camp Greene, NC November 21, 1917. The division was composed of the 4th, 7th, 30th, and 38th Infantry Regiments, the 10th, 18th, and 76th FA Regiments and the 6th Engineer Regiment with a total of 28,000 men. It underwent training at Camp Greene, NC and Fort Bliss, TX and shipped to France arriving in April 1918. A monument to the origination of the 3rd Division stands today in Charlotte, NC at the corner of Wilkinson Blvd. and Monument  St.

The 3rd Infantry Division earned the motto "Rock of the Marne" at the Marne River near Chateau-Thierry on July 15, 1918. When flanking units retreated, then Division Commander Major General Joseph Dickman, told our French allies "Nous Resterons La-We shall remain here." This motto is on the 3rd Infantry Division Distinctive Insignia. Although the stand was quite successful, we paid a high price. General "Black Jack" Pershing said it best, when he called the Divisions performance one of the most brilliant of our military annals.

World War II was to add even greater glory to the Marne Legend. As the sole United States fighting force for 531 continuous days of combat, the 3d Infantry Division fought in places like Casablanca, Anzio, Tome, the Vosges Mountains, Colmar, the Siegfried Line, Palermo, Nurnberg, Munich, Berchtesgaden, and Salzburg.

3d Infantry Division soldiers earned two medals of Honor during World War I, and 36 more during World War II. The most decorated soldier in World War II was among them: Lieutenant Audie Murphy, serving with the 15th Infantry in Italy and France.

During the Korean War, the Division, being known as the "Fire Brigade", received ten Battle Stars. The Korean War also added eleven more Medal of Honor winners, bringing the total to forty-nine.

In April 1958, the Marne Division returned to Germany to secure the defense of Western Europe and ultimately win the Cold War.

In November of 1990, soldiers of the 3d Infantry Division were once again called into action. Following Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, over 6,000 Marne men and women deployed with operation Desert Storm as part of the Allied Coalition which brought a swift end to Saddam Hussien’s military aggression in the Gulf region. Nearly 1,000 soldiers deployed to Southeastern Turkey and Northern Iraq to Provide Comfort to Kurdish Refugees. Almost 100 were part of Task Force Victory, which began the task of rebuilding Kuwait.

Today, a new chapter of Marne history begins with the activation of the 3d Infantry Division (Mechanized) at Fort Stewart and in the Coastal Empire. They have moved from Germany and now are in Fort Stewart GA. (3 Brigades) the third brigade is in Fort Benning GA and the Aviation Brigade at Hunter Army Airfield.

Fort Stewart is official home to the 3rd Infantry Division - Mechanized, formerly the 24th Infantry Division - Mechanized. Nicknamed the "Marne Division" after the historic battle of the Marne River in France during WWI, the reputation of the 3rd Infantry Division equals the 24th.

Operation Iraqi Freedom
Early in 2003 the deployability and fighting capability of the Marne Division was highly visible Worldwide when the entire Division deployed in weeks to Kuwait. It was called on subsequently to spearhead Coalition forces in Operation Iraqi Freedom, fighting its way to Baghdad in early April, leading to the end of the Saddam Hussein government imposed tyranny over the people of Iraq. Today the Division remains there contributing to stabilization and nation building with Coalition forces and the people of that long oppressed nation.

The Fort Stewart-based 3rd Infantry Division, which helped lead the charge to Baghdad, is the first Army division tapped to return to Iraq since the March 2003 invasion. The Marne team continues our deployment to Kuwait and Iraq in support of our assigned mission as part of the global war on terror. 1st Brigade Combat Team arrived at its assigned Forward Operating Bases in Iraq and is initiating operations. Aviation Brigade is completing its move into Iraq and has also begun operations. The rest of the Division continues to move equipment and personnel to our camps in Kuwait.

Thanks to Henry Burke, Outpost 3, for the history of the 3ID.

"ROCK OF THE MARNE!"

Near Mézy, France, July 1918. Here the German Army made its last great attack of World War I. It struck in the Marne River area along the road to Paris, and the weight of the blow fell on the 30th and 38th U.S. Infantry Regiments of the 3rd Division. This was their first fight.
Firing in three directions, blasted by artillery fire, taking all flesh and blood could stand, the regiments held on doggedly and threw the enemy back across the Marne. This defense checked the Germans' assault and made an Allied offensive possible.
General Pershing called it "one of the most brilliant pages of our military annals."

Thanks to Lew Pergament for this information.

 



Shoulder Sleeve Insignia    
Desert Patch                           Subdued Patch

Description: Upon a blue square three white stripes from heraldic sinister chief to dexter base, the blue background between the white stripes, all within a green border.

Symbolism: The blue stripes represent Infantry, loyalty and the steadfastness of American soldiers. The three diagonal white stripes designate the major operations in which the division took part up until the signing of the Armistice ( the Marne, St. Mihiel, and the Meuse-Argonne), as well as represent the numerical designation of the Division.

            

The origin of Nous Resterons La,
the slogan of the 3rd Infantry Division

Distinctive Unit Insignia
Description: A silver colored metal and enamel device, consisting of a silver rock issuing from the inner arc of a blue annulet inscribed with the words "NOUS RESTERONS LA"
 (We Will Stay There) in silver letters; on the rock and surmounting the upper part of the annulet, a silver wyvern winged blue bearing thereon three silver diagonal bands.

Symbolism: The rock, inscription, and wyvern refer to the two designations by which men of the 3d Infantry Division are popularly known, i.e., "Marne Men" and "Blue and White Devils." The rock represents the division's firm stand against the German offensive at the Marne River in World War I.

It was there that the commanding officer, Major General Joseph Dickman, stated "Nous Resterons LA." The wyvern, an heraldic form of the devil, bears the division's blue and white stripes on its wing in commemoration of the division's action at Anzio, Italy, in World War II where they were called "Blue and White Devils" by the enemy.

 

"Rock of the Marne!"

The 3d Infantry Division (Mechanized) has one of the most successful combat records of any U.S. Army division. It has paid a high price for this distinction, suffering nearly 35,000 wartime casualties. Forty nine members of the 3d Infantry Division have been awarded the Medal of Honor while serving our nation.

World War I
Activated in November 1917 during World War I at Camp Greene, North Carolina,. It went into combat for the first time eight months later in France. At midnight on July 14, 1918, the Division earned lasting distinction. Engaged in the Aisne-Marne Offensive as a member of the American Expeditionary Force to Europe, the Division was protecting Paris with a position on the banks of the Marne River, surrounding units retreated, the 3rd Infantry Division remained rock solid and earned its reputation as the "Rock of the Marne".  Although the stand was highly successful, a steep price was paid. General "Black Jack" Pershing said the Division's performance one of the most brilliant of our nation’s military history. During the war two members of the division were awarded the Medal of Honor (MOH).

 

 

World War II
World War II brought even greater glory. The 3rd Infantry Division fought in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, France, Germany and Austria for 531 consecutive days of combat. 3rd Infantry Division soldiers earned 36 MOH during World War II. At Anzio the Division fought off three German divisions. While there it suffered more than 900 casualties, the most in one day of any division in World War II. The most highly decorated soldier of the war, LT Audie Murphy served with the 15th Infantry Regiment.

Korean War
During the Korean War, the Division, was known as the "Fire Brigade" for its rapid response to crisis. It received ten Battle Stars. The Division fought gallantly throughout the war, insuring the freedom South Korea maintains today.  Eleven more MOH recipients were added to the division's list of heroes during the Korean War.
Germany
 In April 1958 to April 1996, the Marne Division was station in Germany serving as a key link in securing the defense of Western Europe and contributing greatly to the ultimate triumph over Communism in the Cold War in 1989. 

 

Operation Desert Storm
In November 1990, soldiers of the 3rd Infantry Division were once again called into action. Following Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, more than 6,000 Marne men and women deployed with the 1st Armored Division on Operation Desert Storm as part of the Allied Coalition. Later nearly 1,000 soldiers deployed to southeastern Turkey and northern Iraq to provide comfort to Kurdish refugees. Another group of nearly 1,000 were part of Task Force Victory rebuilding Kuwait.
 
Egypt, Bosnia and Kosovo
In 1996 the Division was restationed at Fort Stewart, Fort Benning, and Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia. The Division repeatedly demonstrated its deployability  since then by maintaining a battalion, and later a brigade task force  presence in Kuwait. It has also moved sizeable forces to Egypt, Bosnia and Kosovo in partnership training and peacekeeping missions. Since Sept 11, 2001 units have been sent to Afghanistan, Pakistan and other Middle Eastern countries to support the War on Terrorism.
Operation Iraqi Freedom I
Early in 2003 the deployability and fighting capability of the Marne Division was highly visible Worldwide when the entire Division deployed in weeks to Kuwait. It was called on subsequently to spearhead Coalition forces in Operation Iraqi Freedom, fighting its way to Baghdad in early April, leading to the end of the Saddam Hussein government imposed tyranny over the people of Iraq.
Operation Iraqi Freedom III
The Fort Stewart-based 3rd Infantry Division, which helped lead the charge to Baghdad, is the first Army division tapped to return to Iraq since the March 2003 invasion. The 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and Aviation Brigade Combat Teams arrived at its assigned Forward Operating Bases in Iraq and completed its operations in January 2006.
Operation Iraqi Freedom 2007-8

Ready to shift
Plan has 3,800 soldiers departing in mid-March

‘Raider Brigade’ takes over Ramadi

The Defense Department announced Feb. 16, 2007 that the 3rd Infantry Division Headquarters, from Fort Stewart, Georgia, will deploy to Iraq beginning in March 2007. This headquarters previously was scheduled to deploy for Operation Iraqi Freedom in June 2007, as announced on November 17, 2006, but will now be accelerated by a little over three months. The unit leadership notified the Soldiers and their families prior to this announcement.

RAMADI, Iraq — The Germany-bound “Ready First Brigade” of the 1st Armored Division formally relinquished combat authority in and around Ramadi  following a fierce, eight-month campaign that commanders say broke a long and bloody stalemate between U.S. soldiers, Sunni Arab tribes and Islamist militants here. The breakthrough — which occurred when a majority of local tribe leaders decided to ally with coalition forces against Islamist militants — bodes well for the incoming 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division “Raider Brigade,” which is now on its third tour in Iraq.

“We leave here with a great sense of accomplishment,” Col. Sean B. MacFarland, commander of the 1-1AD said at Sunday’s transfer of authority ceremony. “Although there is still work to be done, we take comfort knowing that we are relinquishing our job to the superior soldiers of the Raider Brigade.”

It appears as if the 3rd Brigade will be stationed in the southeast section of Baghdad, possibly under the umbrella of the 3rd Infantry Division. "General (Maj. Gen. Rick) Lynch and I are in contact every other day and we have a pretty good relationship," said brigade commander Col. Wayne Grigsby Jr. "It would be great to be part of his team."
Grigsby has already been in touch with another of the division's brigade commanders, Col. John Charlton, who took his unit, the 1st BCT, to Baghdad in January.
"We talk about issues that he's had to address since his arrival in Iraq, things that we may need to focus on in the weeks ahead," Grigsby said. "Keeping those communication lines open is important."

 

Operation Iraqi Freedom 2009-10

3rd ID arrives in Kuwait, trains for MND-N mission
Spc. Michael Adams
3rd ID Public Affairs

CAMP BUEHRING, KUWAIT – About 400 Dog Face Soldiers of the Division Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Infantry Division arrived in Kuwait Sunday October 11th as part of the division's deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

The Soldiers left Fort Stewart, Oct. 10, 2009 saying farewell to their Families and the coastal Georgia community. Soldiers from the DSTB will comprise the headquarters for Task Force Marne, the command and control element for Mult-National Division-North, Iraq.

While in Kuwait, Soldiers will complete their final training requirements before moving to their locations in Iraq. Training here includes vehicle rollover training, weapons ranges, and environmental training. The time spent in Kuwait helps Soldiers to acclimatize to the desert environment and ensure all of their personal equipment is ready to go before moving forward.

The division has deployed to Iraq on three separate occasions, but this will be the first time the headquarters will be located in the north.

Other brigades from the division will follow the DSTB and deploy to other locations in both Iraq and Afghanistan. The 1st Heavy Brigade Combat Team and 3rd HBCT will be located near Baghdad, Iraq, while 2nd HBCT will be in MNDN, near Mosul. The 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team is anticipating an Iraq deployment by the summer 2010.

The 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade is deploying to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Operation Enduring Freedom - Afghanistan

Operation New Dawn 2010 - ?

Description: Description: Description: back.jpg (5999 bytes)

   Operation Iraqi Freedom-1 
Fallen Heroes


(As reported on Dec. 3, 2003)

In grateful memory of those who have
sacrificed their lives for us.
The task was to give the gift of freedom.

SPC Anguiano, Edward John, A Co, 3d FSB
SPC Sanders, Gregory Paul, B Co, 3/69th AR
SGT Solomon, Roderic Antoine, A Co, 2/7th IN
PFC Creighton-Weldon, A Co, 7th IN
CPL Curtin, Michael Edward, A Co, 2/7th IN|
PFC Rincon, Diego Fernando, A Co, 2/7th IN
SGT Williams, Eugene, A Co, 2/7th IN
SFC Davis, Wilbert, HHC, 3/69th AR
SSG Buggs, George Edward, HHC, 3d FSB
PFC Bellard, Wilfred D. C Btry, 1/41st FA
SPC Cunningham, Daniel Francis Jr., C Btry, 1/41st FA
PV2 Jones, DevonDimilo, C Btry, 1/41st FA
CPT Aiken, Tristan Neil, HHB, 1/41st FA
SFC Smith, Paul Ray, B Co, 11th ENGR Bn
SSG Booker, Stevon Alexander, A Co, 1/64th AR
SSG Hollinsaid, Lincoln Daniel, B Co, 11th Engr Bn
1LT Kaylor, Jeffrey J., C Btry, 39th FA
PFC Miller, Anthony Scott, HHC, 2nd Bde
SPC Mitchell, George A. Jr., HHC, 2d Bde
SGT Brown, Henry Levon, HHC, 1/64th AR
SFC Marshall, John Winston, HHC, 3/15th IN
PFC Meyer, Jason Michael, D Co, 11th EN
SSG Stever, Robert Anthony, HQ Co, 3/15th IN
PFC Rockhold, Marlin Tyrone, B Co, 3/7th IN
SGT Crockett, Michael Tyron, B Co,3/ 7th IN
SPC Bertoldie, Joel Lin, HHC, 4/64th AR Regt
SSG Hart, Nathaniel Jr., 260th QM Bn
PFC Sims, Charles Marques, 549th MP CO
CPT Adamouski, James F., B Co, 2/3 AVN Regt
SPC Boule, Matthew George, B Co, 2/3 AVN
CW4 Halvorsen, Eric Anders, B Co, 2/3 AVN Regt
CW2 Jamar, Scott, B Co, 2/3 AVN Regt
SGT Pedersen, Michael Francis, B Co, 2/3 AVN Regt
CW3 Smith, Eric Allen, B Co, 2/3 AVN Regt
CPT Korn, Edward Jason, HHT Cmd 2d AR BN, Ft. Knox, KY
SPC Carlock, Ryan Gene, 416th Trans Co
PV2 Huxley, Gregory Paul Jr., B Co, 317th Engr Bn,
PV2 Prewitt, Kelley, Stephen, HHC, 2/69th AR
SSG Hemingway, Terry Wayne, C Co, 1/15th IN
1SG Garza, Joe Jesus, HHC, 1/30th IN
SGT Robbins, Todd James, C Btry, 13th FA
SFC Rehn, Randall Scott, C Btry, 13th FA
PFC Smith, Jeremiah David, 1/34th AR Bn
SPC Oaks, Donald Samuel Jr., D Co, 1/39th FA

These forever Remembered, these Keepers of the Constitution, these our Fellows gave their last full measure of devotion to duty that they might bless the world with Liberty.


This page courtesy of the Frontline March 18, 2004

 

 

  Operation Iraqi Freedom-3  
Fallen Heroes

Many other units were also attached to the 3rd Infantry Division in Operation Iraqi Freedom, such as the 1-184TH INF AIR ASSLT unit which lost 22 members during OIF. We offer our thanks and condolences to these brave heroes who gave all.

 

Rank

Name

Unit

Date

1

CPT

Lusk, Joe F. II

3-3 AVN

21-Jan-05

2

SGT

Torres, Daniel

B-2-7 IN

4-Feb-05

3

SSG

Bayow, Steven

B-2-7 IN

4-Feb-05

4

SGT*

Gooding, Dakota L.

C-5-7 CAV

13-Feb-05

5

SGT

Knox, Rene Jr.

C-5-7 CAV

13-Feb-05

6

SSG*

Lake, Chad W.

C-5-7 CAV

13-Feb-05

7

SPC*

Brangman, David J.

A-3-69 AR

13-Feb-05

8

SFC

Salie, David J.

B-2-69 AR

14-Feb-05

9

SPC

Carter, Justin B.

E-1-15 IN

16-Feb-05

10

CPL*

Palmatier, Jacob C.

HHC-1-30 IN

24-Feb-05

11

SPC

Deem, Michael S.

3rd SC Co

25-Feb-05

12

SPC

Farnan, Colby M.

B-4-1 FA

25-Feb-05

13

SPC

Moski, Jason L.

B-4-1 FA

25-Feb-05

14

PFC

Choi, Min S.

HHC-6-8 CAV

26-Feb-05

15

PFC*

Giles, Landon S.

HHC-6-8 CAV

26-Feb-05

16

PFC

Anderson, Danny L.

F-26 FSB

27-Feb-05

17

PFC

Ali, Azhar

HHC-1-69 IN

2-Mar-05

18

PV2

Lwin, Wai P.

HHC-1-69 IN

2-Mar-05

19

SPC

Salem, Adriana N.

3 FSB

4-Mar-05

20

SPC

Koch, Matthew A.

C-70 EN

9-Mar-05

21

SGT

Heltzel, Paul M.

B-2-156 IN

15-Mar-05

22

SSG

Kieffer, Ricky A

HHS-1-182 FA (MP)

15-Mar-05

23

PFC

Lewis, Lee A. Jr.

HHC-3-15 IN

18-Mar-05

24

CPL*

Bruce, Travis R.

170 MP Co

23-Mar-05

25

SGT*

Godbolt, Lee M.

A-1-156 AR

26-Mar-05

26

SGT*

Sinclair, Isiah J.

A-1-156 AR

26-Mar-05

27

SGT

Morris, Kelly. S

B-1-64 AR

30-Mar-05

28

CPL*

Richardson, William D.

A-1-41 IN

3-Apr-05

29

SPC

Watkins, Glenn J.

A-1-184 IN

5-Apr-05

30

SGT

Garcia, Javier J.

C-1-64 AR

5-Apr-05

31

CPL*

Lopez, Manuel III

D-3-7 IN

12-Apr-05

32

SPC

Ramirez Gonzalez, Aleina

HHC-1-3 BTB

15-Apr-05

33

PFC

Sirko, Steven F.

HHC-1-30 IN

17-Apr-05

34

PFC*

Knott, Joseph L.

RHHT-3ACR

17-Apr-05

35

PFC

Huff, Sam W.

170 MP Co

17-Apr-05

36

CPL*

Pfister, Jacob M.

A-3-7 IN

19-Apr-05

37

SPC*

Wessel, Kevin S. K.

A-3-7 IN

19-Apr-05

38

CPL*

Walters, Gary W. Jr.

A-1-9 FA

24-Apr-05

39

1SG

Millsap, Timmy J.

A-70 EN

25-Apr-05

40

SPC

Rice, David L.

HHB-1-5 FA

26-Apr-05

41

SPC

DeBlanc, Darren A

C-2-14 IN

29-Apr-05

42

PFC

Cooper, Charles S. Jr.

C-2-14 IN

29-Apr-05

43

SGT

Parker, Kenya A

HHC 3ID

30-Apr-05

44

SGT*

Saxton, Stephen P.

ADA-1-3 ACR

3-May-05

45

SSG

Brooks, William J.

HHC-1-64 AR

3-May-05

46

SPC

Givens, Steven R.

A 1-15 IN

8-May-05

47

PFC

Zeigler, Kenneth E. II

B-1-64 AR

12-May-05

48

SGT

Jodon, Andrew

E-3-69 AR

12-May-05

49

SPC*

Anderson, Travis

B-2-7 IN

13-May-05

50

SSG*

Gillican, Charles C. III

1-230th FA

14-May-05

51

PFC*

Riggs, Wesley R.

D-2-7 IN

17-May-05

52

PFC

Eisenhauer, Wyatt, D

HHC-2-70 AR

19-May-05

53

SGT*

Sembly, Bernard L.

A-2-156 IN

19-May-05

54

SGT*

Fell, Robin V.

A-2-156 IN

19-May-05

55

SGT*

Schamberg, Kurt D.

C-2-14 IN

20-May-05

56

SGT

Schall, Kenneth J.

A-2-70 AR

22-May-05

57

SGT*

Wilkerson, Charles T.

3-3 ACR

22-May-05

58

SGT

Morgain, Carl J.

A-1-112 IN

22-May-05

59

SFC*

Hahn, Peter J.

B-2-156 IN

24-May-05

60

SPC

Fisher, Dustin C.

B-1-76 FA

24-May-05

61

PFC

Wallace, Jeffrey R.

B-1-76 FA

24-May-05

62

SGT

Drier, Charles A.

B-1-76 FA

24-May-05

63

SSG*

Cortes, Victor M. III

E-703 FSB

29-May-05

64

SPC

Poelman, Eric J.

L-3-3 ACR

5-Jun-05

65

SPC*

Ulbrich, Brian S.

L-3-3 ACR

5-Jun-05

66

SSG

Vasquez, Justin L.

L-3-3 ACR

5-Jun-05

67

SGT*

Romines, Brian M.

A-2-123 FA

6-Jun-05

68

1LT

Fasnacht, Michael J

B-1-15 IN

8-Jun-05

69

SGT

Murrray, David J.

B-1088 EN

9-Jun-05

70

CPL*

Lapinski, Stanley J.

B-3-7 IN

11-Jun-05

71

SGT*

Jones, Anthony G.

104 TC

14-Jun-05

72

1LT*

Harris, Noah

B-2-69 AR

17-Jun-05

73

CPL

Long, William A.

B-2-69 AR

17-Jun-05

74

SGT*

Duplantier, Arnold II

C-1-184 IN

22-Jun-05

75

SFC

Phelps, Christopher W

I-3-3 ACR

23-Jun-05

76

SGT*

Tackett, Joseph

1-76 FA

23-Jun-05

77

SPC

Kaufman, Charles A.

C-1-128 IN

26-Jun-05

78

2LT

Coutu, Matthew S.

64 MP

27-Jun-05

79

CW2

Shephard, Steven E.

3-3 AVN

27-Jun-05

80

CW4

Mariotti, Keith R

3-3 AVN

27-Jun-05

81

SPC

Carrillo, Rafael A Jr.

HHC-1-64 AR

28-Jun-05

82

SSG*

Mercer, Chad M.

B-2-121 IN

30-Jun-05

83

SSG

Bright, Scottie L.

HOW-3-3 ACR

5-Jul-05

84

CPL

Cambridge, Lyle J

HOW-3-3 ACR

5-Jul-05

85

PFC*

Mazzarella, Anthony

B-1-13 AR

5-Jul-05

86

SGT

Sutton, Timothy J.

TANK-3-3 ACR

11-Jul-05

87

SPC

Yahudah, Benyahmin B.

HHC-1-64 AR

13-Jul-05

88

SPC

Hines, Timothy J. Jr.

64 MP

14-Jul-05

89

SPC

Hartley, Jared D.

HHD-125 FSB

15-Jul-05

90

SSG

Pena-Romero, Jorge L.

B-1-11 ACR

16-Jul-05

91

SPC

Williams, Ronnie D

K-3-3 ACR

17-Jul-05

92

SGT

McGill, Arthur R.

B-1-9 FA

19-Jul-05

93

SGT

Taylor, Christopher J.

B-1-41 FA

24-Jul-05

94

SGT

Monzon, Milton M. Jr.

K-3-3 ACR

24-Jul-05

95

PFC

Villatoro, Ramon A

K-3-3 ACR

24-Jul-05

96

SSG

Montefering, Jason W.

K-3-3 ACR

24-Jul-05

97

SPC*

Dallas, Ernest W. Jr.

K-3-3 ACR

24-Jul-05

98

SGT*

Kinlow, James O.

A-2-121 IN

24-Jul-05

99

SSG*

Fuller, Carl R.

A-2-121 IN

24-Jul-05

100

SPC*

Brunson, Jacques E.

A-2-121 IN

24-Jul-05

101

SGT*

Thomas, John F.

A-2-121 IN

24-Jul-05

102

SPC

Harting, Adam J.

A-3-69 AR

25-Jul-05

103

SPC

Myers, Edward L.

B-3-69 AR

27-Jul-05

104

SPC

Tollefson, John O.

411 MP

27-Jul-05

105

SPC

Butler, Adrian J.

411 MP

27-Jul-05

106

PV2

Guerra, Ernesto R.

HHC-4-3 BTB

28-Jul-05

107

SPC*

Swaney, Robert A.

HOW-3-3 ACR

30-Jul-05

108

PFC

Scheuerman, Jason D.

HHC-1-30 IN

30-Jul-05

109

SGT*

Shelly, Ronnie L.

A-2-121 IN

30-Jul-05

110

SGT*

Haggin, Jonathan C.

A-2-121 IN

30-Jul-05

111

SFC

Anderson, Victor A.

A-2-121 IN

30-Jul-05

112

SSG*

Jones, David R. Sr.

A-2-121 IN

30-Jul-05

113

SPC

Ganey, Jerry L.

HHC-648 EN

3-Aug-05

114

SPC*

Gibbs, Mathew V.

HHC-648 EN

3-Aug-05

115

SFC*

Warren, Charles H.

HHC-648 EN

3-Aug-05

116

SGT*

Jeffcoat, Brahim J.

A-1-111 IN

6-Aug-05

117

SPC

Krout, Kurt E.

A-1-111 IN

6-Aug-05

118

SPC*

Reyna, Seferino J.

A-70 EN

7-Aug-05

119

PFC

Rios, Hernando

B-1-69 AR

7-Aug-05

120

SGT*

Kalladeen, Anthony N.

B-1-69 AR

7-Aug-05

121

SPC

Carrasquillo, Miguel

HOW-1-76 FA

9-Aug-05

122

SPC

Straub, Francis J.

A-1-111 IN

9-Aug-05

123

SPC

Pellegrini, Gennaro Jr.

A-1-111 IN

9-Aug-05

124

PFC

Kulick, John

A-1-111 IN

9-Aug-05

125 PFC Detample, Nathaniel E. A-1-111 IN 9-Aug-05
126 1LT Giamo, David L D-2-7 IN 12-Aug-05
127 SPC Bell, Rusty W. A-603 AV 12-Aug-05
128 SPC Derks, Brian K. F-1-11 ACR 13-Aug-05
129 SGT* Strickland,Thomas J. HHC-1-108 AR 15-Aug-05
130 SGT* Saylor, Paul A HHC-1-108 AR 15-Aug-05
131 SPC* Dingler, Joshua P HHC-1-108 AR 15-Aug-05

132

SGT*

Stokely, Michael J..

E-348 AR (TF 108)

16-Aug-05

DoD Identifies Army Casualties

August 22, 2005
DoD Identifies Army Casualties
The Department of Defense announced today the death of four soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died on August 18, 2005, in Samarra, Iraq, where an improvised explosive device detonated near their HMMWV following a mine assessing mission. The soldiers were assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Killed were:
Sgt. Nathan K. Bouchard, 24, of Wildomar, Calif.
Staff Sgt. Jeremy W. Doyle,   24, of Chesterton, Md.
Spc. Ray M. Fuhrmann, II,   28, of Novato, Calif.
Pfc. Timothy J. Seamans,   20, of Jacksonville, Fla.
 

August 24, 2005

1st Lt. Carlos J. Diaz, 27, of Juana Diaz, P.R., died on Aug. 23, 2005, in Baqubah, Iraq, when enemy forces detonated an explosion near his position. Diaz was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

September 2, 2005

Sgt. Monta S. Ruth,   26, of Winston-Salem, N.C., died on Aug. 31, 2005, in Samarra, Iraq, where an improvised explosive device detonated near his military vehicle during security patrol operations. Ruth was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

September 5, 2005
The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died on Sept. 1, 2005, in Baghdad, Iraq, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their HMMWV during patrol operations. Both soldiers were assigned to the Army National Guard's 108th Cavalry Regiment, 48th Infantry Brigade, Griffin, Ga.
Killed were:
Staff Sgt. George R. Draughn Jr., 29, of Decatur, Ga.
Sgt. 1st Class Robert L. Hollar Jr., 35, of Griffin, Ga.

Sgt. 1st Class Lonnie J. Parson, 39, of Norcross, Ga., died on Sept. 2, 2005, in Baghdad, Iraq, when his M3A2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle was struck by an enemy explosive device. Parson was assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

September 6, 2005

Spc. Luke C. Williams, 35, of Knoxville, Tenn., died on Sept. 5, 2005 in Baghdad, Iraq, when the HMMWV he was riding in accidentally rolled over into a ditch. Williams was assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

September 7, 2005

Sgt. Matthew C. Bohling,   22, of Eagle River, Alaska, died on Sept. 5, 2005, in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, where an improvised explosive device detonated near his HMMWV during combat operations. Bohling was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

September 8, 2005
The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died on Sept. 6, 2005, in Baghdad, Iraq, where an improvised explosive device detonated near their HMMWV causing it to rollover. Both soldiers were assigned to the Brigade Troops Battalion, Division Support Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
Staff Sgt. Jude R. Jonaus, 27, of Miami, Fla.
Sgt. Franklin R. Vilorio, 26, of Miami, Fla.
 

September 14, 2005

Sgt. Kurtis D. K. Arcala, 22, of Palmer, Alaska, died on Sept. 11, 2005, in Tikrit, Iraq, where an improvised explosive device detonated near his position during convoy escort operations. Arcala was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

September 20, 2005

Sgt. Deckard dies in action

FORT STEWART, Ga.-- The Department of Defense announced today the death of a 3rd Infantry Division Soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt Matthew Lynn Deckard, 29, of Elizabethtown, KY, died Sept. 16, 2005 in Baghdad, Iraq where an improvised explosive device detonated near his position while he was on patrol operations. Deckard was assigned to Company C, 4th Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment; 4th Brigade, 3rd Inf. Div., as an M1 armor crewman.

Sgt Deckard entered the Army Jan. 20, 1995. He arrived at Fort Stewart, “Home of the 3rd Inf. Div.,” Feb. 24, 2001.

September 21, 2005

Two Marne Soldiers die in action supporting OIF

FORT STEWART, Ga.-- The Department of Defense announced today the death of two 3rd Infantry Division Soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died in Baghdad, Iraq, on Sept. 16, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their M1A1 Abrams tank during patrol operations. Both soldiers were assigned to the 4th Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

1st Sgt. Alan N. Gifford, 39, of Tallahassee, Fla., entered the Army Feb. 4, 1986. He arrived Sept. 10, 2003 at Fort Stewart, Home of the 3rd Infantry Division. 1st Sgt. Gifford was a Senior Armored Cavalry Sergeant assigned to Co. C, 4th Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team.

Spc. David H. Ford IV, 20, of Ironton, Ohio, entered the Army July 1, 2003. He arrived Nov. 18, 2003 at Fort Stewart, Home of the 3rd Infantry Division. Spc. Ford was an M1A1 Armor Crewman assigned to Co. C, 4th Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team.


September 26, 2005

The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died of injuries sustained in Baghdad, Iraq, on Sept. 23, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their M113 armored personnel carrier. They also were attacked by enemy forces using small arms fire. Both soldiers were assigned to the Army National Guard's 1st Battalion, 184th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, Oakdale, Calif.
Killed were:

Staff Sgt. Daniel R. Scheile, 37, of Antioch, Calif., who died on Sept. 24.

Sgt. Paul C. Neubauer, 40, of Oceanside, Calif., who died on Sept. 23.

September 29, 2005

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Staff Sgt. Jason A. Benford, 30, of Toledo, Ohio, died in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, on Sept. 27, when his patrol was attacked by enemy forces using small arms fire. Benford was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

October 5, 2005

Staff Sgt. Jens E. Schelbert, 31, of New Orleans, La., died in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, on Oct. 1, when his forward operating base was attacked by enemy forces using indirect fire. Schelbert was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

October 12, 2005

The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, on Oct. 10, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their M2A2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle during combat operations. Both soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:
Sgt. 1st Class Brandon K. Sneed, 33, of Norman, Okla. 
Sgt. Leon M. Johnson, 28, of Jacksonville, Fla.

October 21, 2005

The Department of Defense announced today the death of three Soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died in Balad, Iraq, on Oct. 19, when their HMMWV was struck by enemy indirect fire during patrol operations. The Soldiers were assigned to the 5th Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
Sgt. Arthur A. Mora Jr., 23, of Pico Rivera, Calif.
Spc. Russell H. Nahvi, 24, of Arlington, Texas.
Spc. Jose E. Rosario
, 20, of St. Croix, Virgin Islands.

October 25, 2005

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Staff Sgt. George T. Alexander, Jr., 34, of Clanton, Ala., died at Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, on Oct. 22, of injuries sustained in Samarra, Iraq, on Oct. 17, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his Bradley Fighting Vehicle. Alexander was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

October 25, 2005
The Department of Defense announced today the deaths of five soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, on Oct. 15, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their M2A2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle during combat operations. The soldiers were assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:
Staff Sgt. Vincent E. Summers, 38, of South Haven, Mich.
Spc. Thomas H. Byrd, 21, of Cochise, Ariz.
Spc. Jeffrey W. Corban, 30, of Elkhart, Ind.
Spc. Richard A. Hardy, 24, of Newcomerstown, Ohio.
Spc. Timothy D. Watkins, 24, of San Bernardino, Calif.

October 28, 2005

The Department of Defense announced today the deaths of four soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Capt. Michael J. Mackinnon, 30, of Helena, Mont., died on Oct. 27, in Baghdad, Iraq, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his HMMWV during convoy operations. Mackinnon was assigned to the Army's 4th Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died in Rustamiyah, Iraq, on Oct. 26, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their HMMWV. Both Soldiers were assigned to the Army's 3rd Forward Support Battalion, Division Support Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
Master Sgt. Thomas A. Wallsmith, 38, of Carthage, Mo.
Sgt. 1st Class Ramon A. Acevedoaponte, 51, of Watertown, N.Y.

Sgt. Michael T. Robertson, 28, of Houston, Texas, died at Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, on Oct. 25, of injuries sustained in Samarra, Iraq, on Oct. 17, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his Bradley Fighting Vehicle. The incident fatally injured another soldier and was reported on Oct. 25. Robertson was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

October 31, 2005

Pfc. Dillon M. Jutras, 20, of Fairfax Station, Va., died in Al Anbar Province, Iraq, on Oct. 28, from injuries sustained while conducting combat operations. Jutras was assigned to the Army's 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

November 2, 2005

Pfc Rojas dies in action
FORT STEWART, Ga. -- The Department of Defense announced yesterday the death of a 3rd Infantry Division soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Private First Class Kenny D. Rojas, 21, of Pembroke Pines, Fla., died near Bayji, Iraq on Oct. 29 when his unit was conducting a combat patrol and a landmine exploded near his HMMWV.
Rojas entered the military January 28, 2004 and arrived at Fort Stewart, Home of the 3rd Infantry Division on July 29, 2004.
Private First Class Rojas was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga., as an Infantryman.

November 2, 2005

Col. Wood dies in action
FORT STEWART, Ga.-- The Department of Defense announced Oct. 31 the death of a 3rd Infantry Division Soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Colonel William W. Wood, 44, of Panama City, Fla., died Oct. 27 in Baghdad, Iraq when he was directing security operations in response to the detonation of an improvised explosive device. During this response, a second improvised explosive device detonated near his position.
Col. Wood entered the Army May 20, 1984 and arrived June 16, 2004 to Fort Stewart, Home of the 3rd Infantry Division as an Infantry Officer. While here he served as the deputy chief of staff and deputy commander of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team.
During Operation Iraqi Freedom 3, Col. Wood was assigned to and thereby assumed command in July 2005 of the 1st Battalion, 184th Infantry Regiment (Air Assault) of Modesto, Calif.

November 3, 2005

Spc. Dennis J. Ferderer Jr., 20, of New Salem, N.D., died in Ad Duluiyah, Iraq, on Nov. 2, when enemy forces threw a hand grenade at his HMMWV during convoy operations. Ferderer was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

November 7, 2005

Spc. Darren D. Howe, 21, of Beatrice, Neb., died at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas, on Nov. 3, of injuries sustained in Samarra, Iraq, on Oct. 17, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his Bradley Fighting Vehicle. Howe was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.


The Department of Defense announced today the deaths of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died in Baghdad, Iraq, on Nov. 4, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their HMMWV during convoy operations. The soldiers were assigned to the 26th Forward Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
Capt. James M. Gurbisz, 25, of Eatontown, N.J.
Pfc. Dustin A. Yancey, 22, of Goose Creek, S.C.

November 8, 2005

Capt. Joel E. Cahill, 34, of Norwood, Mass., died in Ad Dawr, Iraq, on Nov. 6, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his HMMWV. Cahill was assigned to the Army's 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

November 17, 2005

Pvt. Dylan R. Paytas, 20, of Freedom, Pa., died in Baqubah, Iraq, on Nov. 16, from injuries sustained from multiple gunshot wounds. Paytas was assigned to the 3rd Brigade Troops Battalion, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

November 21, 2005

Staff Sgt. Ivan V. Alarcon, 23, of Jerome, Idaho, died in Tal Afar, Iraq, on Nov. 17, when his HMMWV accidentally rolled over during combat operations. Alarcon was assigned to the Army's 473rd Quartermaster Company, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.

November 28, 2005

Pfc. Ryan D. Christensen, 22, of Spring Lake Heights, N.J., died at the Medical University of Charleston in Charleston, S.C., on Nov. 24, of a non-combat related illness identified in Balad, Iraq, on Nov. 10. Christensen was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

December 5, 2005

Sgt. Grzegorz Jakoniuk, 25, of Schiller Park, Ill., died in Taji, Iraq, on Nov. 30, from non-combat related injuries. Jakoniuk was assigned to the 4th Battalion, 3rd Aviation Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Campbell, Ky. The incident is under investigation.

December 9, 2005

1st Lt. Kevin J. Smith, 28, of Brandon, Fla., died in Baghdad, Iraq, on Dec. 8, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his HMMWV. Smith was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 76th Field Artillery, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

December 13, 2005

Spc. Lex S. Nelson, 21, of Salt Lake City, Utah, died in Tikrit, Iraq on Dec. 12, when he fell from a guard tower. Nelson was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 41st Field Artillery, 1st Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga. The incident is under investigation.

December 14, 2005

Staff Sgt. Curtis A. Mitchell, 28, of Malta, Ohio, died in Baghdad, Iraq, on Dec. 12, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his M1A1 Abrams tank during combat operations. Mitchell was assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 7th Cavalry, 2nd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

December 17, 2005

Spc. Joseph A. Lucas, 23, ofAugusta, Ga., died in Balad, Iraq on Dec. 15, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his HMMWV during combat operations. Lucas was assigned to the 5th Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

December 22, 2005

The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died in Taji, Iraq on Dec. 20, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their HMMWV during combat operations. Both soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:
1st Lt. Michael J. Cleary, 24, of Dallas, Pa.
Spc. Richard Junior D. Naputi, 24, of Talofofo, Guam.

December 27, 2005

Spc. Anthony O. Cardinal, 20, of Muskegon, Mich., died in Baghdad, Iraq, on Dec. 25, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his HMMWV during combat operations. Cardinal was assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

December 27, 2005

Spc. Sergio Gudino, 22, of Pomona, Calif., died in Baghdad, Iraq, on Dec. 25, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his M1A1 tank during combat operations. Gudino was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

January 6, 2006

The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died in Baghdad, Iraq, on Jan. 5, when an improvised explosive device detonated near their HMMWV during convoy operations. Both soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 76th Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
Sgt. Jason Lopezreyes, 29, of Hatillo, Puerto Rico.
Spc. Ryan D. Walker, 25, of Pendleton, Ore.

 

Names of the Soldiers listed below were read at the Memorial Service at the 91st Annual Reunion in
Washington DC on September 19, 2010.

The Department of Defense announced August 23, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Spc. Christopher S. Wright, 23, of Tollesboro, Ky., died Aug. 19 in Pech, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit using small arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Air Field, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced August 20, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Sgt. Martin A. Lugo, 24, of Tucson, Ariz., died Aug. 19 in Puli Alam, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Air Field, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced August 09, 2010 the deaths of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. They died Aug. 8 at Zhari Kandahar, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked their unit using an improvised explosive device.
Killed were:
Sgt. Andrew C. Nicol, 23, of Kensington, N.H.,
Pfc. Bradley D. Rappuhn, 24, of Grand Ledge, Mich.

They were assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced July 20, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Sgt. Anibal Santiago, 37, of Belvidere, Ill., died July 18 in Bagram, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained July 17 in a non-combat related incident in Kwowst, Afghanistan. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced July 20, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Sgt. Justin B. Allen, 23, of Coal Grove, Ohio, died July 18 in Zhari, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when he was shot by insurgents while conducting combat operations. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced July 12, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Spc. Joseph W. Dimock II, 21, of Wildwood, Ill, died July 10 in Salerno, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident when an explosion occurred in an ammunition holding facility during an inventory. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced July 03, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Sgt. Johnny W. Lumpkin, 38, of Columbus, Ga., died July 2 in Balad, Iraq, of wounds sustained July 1 in a non-combat related equipment incident in Taji, Iraq. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 41st Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced June 19, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Capt. Michael P. Cassidy, 41, of Simpsonville, S.C., died June 17 in Mosul, Iraq, of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 9th Field Artillery, 2nd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced June 04, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Pvt. Francisco J. Guardado-Ramirez, 21, of Sunland Park, N.M., died June 2 in Baghdad, Iraq, of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 41st Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced June 02, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. Spc. Jonathan K. Peney, 22, of Marietta, Ga., died June 1 in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when he was shot by enemy forces. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.
UPDATE: June 4, 2010, Spc. Peney was posthumously promoted to Sergeant.

The Department of Defense announced May 25, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Staff Sgt. Amilcar H. Gonzalez, 26, of Miami, Fla., died May 21 in Ash Shura, Iraq, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced May 10, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. Capt. Kyle A. Comfort, 27, of Jacksonville, Ala., died May 8 in Helmand province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced May 08, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Staff Sgt. Esau S.A. Gonzales, 30, of White Deer, Texas, died May 3 in Mosul, Iraq, of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the 38th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced May 03, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Anthony O. Magee, 29, of Hattiesburg, Miss., died April 27 at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, of wounds sustained April 24 when enemy forces attacked his unit with indirect fire at Contingency Operating Base Kalsu, Iskandariyah, Iraq. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced April 25, 2010 the deaths of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. They died April 23 in Logar province, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained while conducting combat operations. Both soldiers were assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:

Sgt. Ronald A. Kubik, 21, of Brielle, N.J., and .

Sgt. Jason A. Santora, 25, of Farmingville, N.Y.

 The Department of Defense announced April 21, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Staff Sgt. James R. Patton, 23, of Fort Benning, Ga., died April 18 in Tikrit, Iraq, of injuries sustained as the result of a helicopter crash. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced April 13, 2010 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Cpl. Michael D. Jankiewicz, 23, of Ramsey, N.J., died April 9 in Zabul, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when the CV-22 Osprey he was flying in crashed. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced April 10, 2010 the deaths of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died April 7 in Mosul, Iraq, when enemy forces attacked their vehicle with an improvised explosive device. The soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
1st Lt. Robert W. Collins, 24, of Tyrone, Ga., and
Pfc. William A. Blount, 21, of Petal, Miss.
UPDATE: April 12, 2010 - Pfc. Blount was posthumously promoted to specialist on April 7, 2010.

The Department of Defense announced March 10, 2010 the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died March 8 north of Al Kut, Iraq, of injuries sustained during a vehicle roll-over. They were assigned to the 203rd Brigade Support Battalion, attached to the 1st Battalion, 10th Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:
Sgt. Aaron M. Arthur, 25, of Lake City, S.C.
Spc. Lakeshia M. Bailey, 23, of Columbus, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced December 14, 2009 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pfc. Jaiciae L. Pauley, 29,
of Austell, Ga., died Dec. 11 in Kirkuk, Iraq, of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division,
Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced November 24, 2009 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Briand T. Williams, 25, of Sparks, Ga., died Nov. 22, in Numaniyah, Iraq, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using small arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 10th Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced November 3, 2009 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Spc. Jonathon M. Sylvestre, 21, of Colorado Springs, Colo., died Nov. 2 in Kut, Iraq, of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 10th Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced October 29, 2009 the deaths of seven soldiers who were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. They died Oct. 26 of wounds suffered when the MH-47 helicopter they were aboard crashed in Darreh-ye Bum, Afghanistan.
Killed were five soldiers assigned to the
3rd Battalion, 160th Special Operations Regiment (Airborne), Hunter Army Airfield, Ga
.:

Chief Warrant Officer Michael P. Montgomery, 36, of Savannah, Ga.

Chief Warrant Officer Niall Lyons, 40, of Spokane, Wash.

Staff Sgt. Shawn H. McNabb, 24, of Terrell, Texas.

Sgt. Josue E. Hernandez Chavez, 23, of Reno, Nev.

Sgt. Nikolas A. Mueller, 26, of Little Chute, Wisc.

Also killed were two soldiers assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.:

Sgt. 1st Class David E. Metzger, 32, of San Diego.

Staff Sgt. Keith R. Bishop, 28, of Medford, N.Y.

The Department of Defense announced October 17, 2009 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Sgt. Christopher M. Rudzinski, 28, of Rantoul, Ill., died Oct. 16 near Kandahar, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his vehicle with an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to 293rd Military Police Company, 385th Military Police Battalion, 16th Military Police Brigade (Airborne), Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced August 31, 2009 the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. They died Aug. 29 in Paktika province, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when they were shot by enemy forces Aug. 28 while conducting combat operations. Both soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Airfield, Ga.
Killed were:
Staff Sgt. Jason S. Dahlke, 29, of Orlando, Fla.; and
Pfc. Eric W. Hario, 19, of Monroe, Mich.

The Department of Defense announced June 17, 2009 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Spc. Jonathan C. O’Neill, 22, of Zephyrhills, Fla., died June 15 at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas, of wounds suffered June 2 in Paktya, Afghanistan, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. He was assigned to the 549th Military Police Company, 385th Military Police Battalion, 16th Military Police Brigade (Airborne) at Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced June 04, 2009 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Spc. Roberto A. Hernandez I, 21, of Far Rockaway, N.Y., died June 2 in Paktya, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when his mounted patrol was attacked with an improvised explosive device and small arms fire. He was assigned to the 549th Military Police Company, 385th Military Police Battalion, 16th Military Police Brigade (Airborne), Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced January 7, 2009 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Staff Sgt. Anthony D. Davis, 29, of Daytona Beach, Fla., died Jan. 6 in Northern Iraq, of wounds suffered when he was shot by enemy forces. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia.

The Department of Defense announced November 8, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Spc. Adam M. Wenger, 27, of Waterford, Mich., died Nov. 5 in Tunnis, Iraq, of injuries sustained during a non-combat incident. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 76th Field Artillery, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced October 6, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. William P. Rudd, 27, of Madisonville, Ky., died Oct. 5 of wounds suffered from enemy small arms fire while on a combat patrol in Mosul, Iraq. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced Sept. 29, 2008, the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Staff Sgt. Ronald Phillips Jr., 33, of Conway, S.C., died Sept. 25 in Bahbahani, Iraq, of wounds suffered when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced September 15, 2008 the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died Sept. 14 in Tunnis, Iraq, of wounds sustained in a non-hostile incident. The soldiers were assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga. The incident is under investigation.
Killed were:

Staff Sgt. Darris J. Dawson, 24, of Pensacola, Fla.

Sgt. Wesley R. Durbin, 26, of Hurst, Texas.

The Department of Defense announced June 13, 2009 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Steve A. McCoy, 23, of Moultrie, Ga., died June 10 at Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, of wounds suffered on March 23 in Baghdad, Iraq, when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 4th Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced May 28, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. 1st Class Jason F. Dene, 37, of Castleton, Vt., died May 25 in Baghdad, Iraq, from injuries suffered in a non-combat related incident on May 24. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced May 27, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pfc. Kyle P. Norris, 22, of Zanesville, Ohio, died May 23 in Balad, Iraq, from wounds suffered when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device during a patrol May 22 in Jurf as Sakhr, Iraq. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced April 23, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pvt. Ronald R. Harrison, 25, of Morris Plains, N.J., died April 22 at Forward Operating Base Falcon near Baghdad, Iraq, of a non-combat related injury. He was assigned to the 703rd Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced April 14, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. William E. Allmon, 25, of Ardmore, Okla., died April 12 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced April 10, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Staff Sgt. Jeffery L. Hartley, 25, of Hempstead, Texas, died April 8 in Kharguliah, Iraq, of wounds suffered when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 10th Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced April 4, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Spc. Charles A. Jankowski, 24, of Panama City, Fla., died March 28, in Arab Jabour, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. He was assigned to the 3rd Brigade Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced April 3, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Sgt. Dayne D. Dhanoolal, 26, of Brooklyn, died March 31 in Baghdad, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced April 2, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Sgt. Jevon K. Jordan, 32, of Norfolk, Va., died Mar. 29 at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Landstuhl, Germany, from wounds suffered Mar. 23 in Abu Jassim, Iraq, when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga
.

The Department of Defense announced March 26, 2008 the death of four soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died March 24 in Baghdad, Iraq, from wounds suffered when their vehicle encountered an improvised explosive on March 23. They were assigned to the 4th Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team,
3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Killed were:

Pvt. George Delgado, 21, of Palmdale, Calif.

Staff Sgt. Christopher M. Hake, 26, of Enid, Okla.

Pfc. Andrew J. Habsieger, 22, of Festus, Mo.

Spc. Jose A. Rubio Hernandez, 24, of Mission, Texas.

The Department of Defense announced March 24, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Pvt. Tyler J. Smith, 22, of Bethel, Maine, died Mar. 21 at Forward Operating Base Falcon near Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered when the base received indirect fire. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced March 15, 2008 the death of five soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
They died March 10 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered when a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device. They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Killed were:

Sgt. 1st. Class Shawn M. Suzch, 32, of Hilltown, Penn.

Staff Sgt. Ernesto G. Cimarrusti, 25, of Douglas, Ariz.

Staff Sgt. David D. Julian, 31, of Evanston, Wyo.

Cpl. Robert T. Mc David, 29, of Starkville, Miss.

Cpl. Scott A. Mc Intosh, 26, of Houston, Texas.

The Department of Defense announced February 22, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Capt. Nathan R. Raudenbush, 25, of Pennsylvania, died Feb. 20 in Busayefi, Iraq, of wounds suffered when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced January 21, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Spc. Richard B. Burress, 25, of Naples, Fla., died Jan. 19 in Al Jabour, Iraq, of wounds sustained when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division,
Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced January 8, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Spc. James D. Gudridge, 20, of Carthage, N.Y., died Jan. 6 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered when his vehicle struck an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 4th Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced January 8, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pfc. Timothy R. Hanson, 23, of Kenosha, Wis., died Jan. 7 in Salmon Pak, Iraq, of wounds suffered from enemy small arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced January 4, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pfc. Joshua R. Anderson, 24, of Jordan, Minn., died Jan 2 in Kamasia, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. He was assigned to the 6th Squadron, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced January 2, 2008 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Reno S. Lacerna, 44, of Waipahu, Hawaii, died Dec. 31, 2007 in Al Qayyarah, Iraq, of a non-combat related illness. He was assigned to the 87th Corps Support Battalion, 3rd Sustainment Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced December 26th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Peter C. Neesley, 28, of Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich., died Dec. 25 in Baghdad, Iraq, of an undetermined cause in a non-combat environment. He was assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced December 14, 2007 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Samuel E. Kelsey, 24, of Troup, Texas, died Dec 13 in Tunnis, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated. He was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced November 23, 2007 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Spc. Melvin L. Henley Jr., 26, of Jackson, Miss., died at Camp Striker in Baghdad on Nov. 21 of injuries suffered from non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the 603rd Aviation Support Battalion, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced November 18, 2007 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Steven C. Ganczewski, 22, of Niagara Falls, N.Y., died Nov. 16, in Balad, Iraq, wounds suffered from a combat-related incident. The incident is under investigation. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced November 17, 2007 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Mason L. Lewis, 26, of Gloucester, Va., died in Baghdad on Nov. 16, as a result of a non-combat related training accident. He was assigned to the 26th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced November 8, 2007 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Lui Tumanuvao, 29, of Fagaalu, American Samoa, died Nov. 7 in Arab Jabour, Iraq, of wounds suffered when he was struck by an improvised explosive device during combat operations. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced November 5th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pfc. Dwane A. Covert Jr., 20, of Tonawanda, N.Y., died Nov 3, in Al-Sahra, Iraq, from injuries suffered in a non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the 104th Transportation Company, 13th Corps Support Sustainment Battalion, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced November 2nd the death of three soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died Oct. 30 of wounds suffered in Salman Pak, Iraq, when enemy forces engaged their unit with small arms fire and an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:
Sgt. Daniel L. McCall, 24, of Pace, Fla. He died in Baghdad, Iraq.

Pfc. Rush M. Jenkins, 22, of Clarksville, Tenn. He died in Salman Pak, Iraq.

Pvt. Cody M. Carver, 19, of Haskell, Okla. He died in Salman Pak, Iraq.

The Department of Defense announced October 9th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Cpl. Benjamin C. Dillon, 22, of Rootstown, Ohio, died Oct. 7 in northern Iraq of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced Sept. 20th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pfc. Christian M. Neff, 19, of Lima, Ohio, died Sept. 19 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered from an improvised explosive device. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced Sept. 17th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. John Mele, 25, of Bunnell, Fla., died Sept. 14 in Arab Jabour, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his unit during combat operations. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced Sept.11th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Cpl. Javier G. Paredes, 24, of San Antonio, died Sept. 5 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered from a rocket propelled grenade. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

Spc. Keith A. Nurnberg, 26, of McHenry, Ill., died Sept. 5 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit during combat operations. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced Sept. 3rd the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. Spc. Travis M. Virgadamo, 19, of Las Vegas, Nev., died Aug. 30 in Taji, Iraq, in a non-combat related incident. He was assigned to the 3d Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 2d Brigade Combat Team, 3d Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced August 20th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
1st Lt. Jonathan W. Edds, 24, of White Pigeon, Mich., died Aug. 17 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his vehicle using an improvised explosive device and small arms fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced August 16th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Spc. Alun R. Howells, 20, of Parlin, Colo., died Aug. 13 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered from enemy direct fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced August 14th the death of four soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died Aug. 11 in Arab Jabour, Iraq, of wounds suffered from an improvised explosive device. They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
Staff Sgt. William D. Scates, 31, of Oklahoma City.
Sgt. Scott L. Kirkpatrick, 26, of Reston, Va.
Sgt. Andrew W. Lancaster, 23, of Stockton, Ill.
Spc. Justin O. Penrod, 24, of Mahomet, Ill.

The Department of Defense announced August 13th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pfc. William L. Edwards, 23, of Houston, died Aug. 11 in Arab Jabour, Iraq, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced July 30th the death of three soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died July 26 in Saqlawiyah, Iraq of wounds sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near their vehicle. They were assigned to the 5th Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team,
3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Killed were:
Sgt. William R. Howdeshell, 37, of Norfolk, Va.,
Spc. Charles E Bilbrey, Jr., 21, of Owego, New York, and
Spc. Jaime Rodriguez, Jr., 19, of Oxnard, Calif.

The Department of Defense announced July 15th the death of one soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Allen A. Greka, 29, of Alpena, Michigan, died July 13 of wounds sustained from a land mine detonation during a dismounted patrol in Jisr Diyala, Iraq. He was assigned to the 3d Battalion, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 3d Brigade Combat Team, 3d Infantry Division at Fort Benning, Georgia.

The Department of Defense announced July 13th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Sgt. Courtney T. Johnson, 26, of Garner, N.C., died July 11 in Besmaya, Iraq, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit with indirect fire. He was assigned to the 3rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced July 11th the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died July 6 in Iraq of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near their vehicle.
Killed were:
Sgt. Gene L. Lamie, 25, of Homerville, Ga. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Pfc. Le Ron A. Wilson, 18, of Queens, N.Y. He was assigned to the 26th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced July 11th the death of a soldier who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. He died July 6 in Muhammad Sath, Iraq, of wounds sustained from an improvised explosive device.
Pfc. Bruce C. Salazar Jr., 24, of Tracy, Calif. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced July 8th the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.
Spc. Michelle R. Ring, 24, of Martin, Tenn
., died July 5 of wounds sustained from enemy mortar fire in Baghdad, Iraq. She was assigned to the 92d Military Police Battalion, Fort Benning, Ga.
Sgt. Thomas P. McGee, 23, of Hawthorne, Calif., died July 6 of wounds sustained when his vehicle struck an improvised explosive device in Wazi Khwa, Afghanistan. He was assigned to the 546th Military Police Company, 385th Military Police Battalion, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced June 26th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pfc. Henry G. Byrd III, 20, of Veguita, N.M., died June 24 in Landstuhl Germany, from a non-combat related illness sustained June 18 while in Iraq. His death is under investigation.
Byrd was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced June 25th the death of three soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died June 23 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered when their unit was attacked by insurgents using an improvised explosive device and small arms fire. They were assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:
Staff Sgt. Michael D. Moody Jr., 31, of Richmond, Va.
Sgt. Chris Davis, 35, of Lubbock, Texas.
Pvt. Shane M. Stinson, 23, of Fullerton, Calif.

The Department of Defense announced June 25th the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Spc. Carter A. Gamble Jr., 24 of Brownstown, Ind., died June 24 in Duraiya, Iraq, of wounds suffered from enemy small arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced June 25th the death of four soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died June 20 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near their vehicle. They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
Maj. Sid W. Brookshire, 36, of Missouri.
Staff Sgt. Darren P. Hubbell, 38, of Tifton, Ga.
Spc. Joe G. Charfauros Jr., 33, of Rota, Mariana Islands.
Pfc. David J. Bentz III, 20, of Newfield, N.J.


The Department of Defense announced June 21st the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died June 19 in Muhammad al Ali, Iraq, of wounds sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near their vehicle.
Killed were:
Sgt. 1st Class William A. Zapfe, 35, of Muldraugh, Ky.
Pfc. Joshua S. Modgling, 22, of Las Vegas. They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Pfc. Larry Parks Jr., 24, of Altoona, Penn.,
died June 18 in Arab Jabor, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.Cpl. Dustin R. Brisky, 26, of Round Rock, Texas, died June 14 in Tallil, Iraq, of wounds suffered from an explosion. He was assigned to the Army Reserve’s 952nd Engineer Company, Paris, Texas. The unit was attached to the 92nd Engineer Battalion, 3rd Sustainment Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga

Pfc. Robert A. Liggett, 23, of Urbana, Ill., died May 29 in Rustamiyah, Iraq, from injuries suffered in a non-combat related incident. His death is under investigation.  Liggett was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced May 25th the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died May 23 of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near their unit in Ramadi, Iraq. They were assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
Staff Sgt. Steve Butcher Jr., 27, of Penfield, N.Y. He died in Ramadi, Iraq.
Pfc. Daniel P. Cagle, 22, of Carson, Calif. He died in Balad, Iraq.

The Department of Defense announced May 17th the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died May 14 in Salman Pak, Iraq, of wounds suffered when their unit came in contact with enemy forces using an improvised explosive device and small arms fire. They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:
Sgt. Allen J. Dunckley, 25, of Yardley, Pa.
Sgt. Christopher N. Gonzalez, 25, of Winslow, Ariz.

The Department of Defense announced May 11th the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died May 8 in Salman Pak, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near their vehicle. Both soldiers were assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:
Sgt. Blake C. Stephens, 25, of Pocatello, Idaho.
Spc. Kyle A. Little, 20, of West Boylston, Mass.

The Department of Defense announced today the death of three soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died Apr. 28 in Salman Pak, Iraq, of wounds suffered when their vehicle was struck with an improvised explosive device and small arms fire during combat operations. They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.
Killed were:
Sgt. Glenn D. Hicks Jr., 24, of College Station, Texas.
Pfc. Jay-D H. Ornsby-Adkins, 21, of Ione, Calif.
Pvt. Cole E. Spencer, 21, of Gays, Ill.

The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died Apr. 27 in Fallujah, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near their vehicle during combat operations. They were assigned to the 5th Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
Killed were:
Spc. Eddie D. Tamez, 21, of Galveston, Texas.
Pfc. David A. Kirkpatrick, 20, of Upland, Ind.

Pfc. Nicholas E. Riehl, 21, of Shiocton, Wis., died Apr. 27 in Fallujah, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his unit during combat patrol. He was assigned to the 5th Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Pfc. Richard P. Langenbrunner, 19, of Fort Wayne, Ind., died Apr. 17 in Rustamiyah, Iraq, of injuries suffered from a non-combat related incident. His death is under investigation. Langenbrunner was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

Staff Sgt. Harrison Brown, 31, of Prichard, Ala., died April 8 in Baghdad, Iraq, when his unit came in contact with enemy forces using an improvised explosive device and small arms fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

Pfc. David N. Simmons, 20, of Kokomo, Ind.,
died April 8 in Baghdad, Iraq, when his unit came in contact with enemy forces using an improvised explosive device and small arms fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

Sgt. Adrian J. Lewis, 30, of Mauldin, S.C., died Mar. 21 in Ramadi, Iraq, of wounds suffered when his unit came in contact with enemy forces using small arms fire during combat operations. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Pfc. Joey T. Sams II, 22, of Spartanburg, S.C., died Mar. 21 at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, of injuries suffered when he was pinned between two vehicles. His death is under investigation. Sams was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga.

Spc. Forrest J. Waterbury, 25, of Richmond, Texas, died Mar. 14 near Ramadi, Iraq, when his unit came in contact with enemy forces using small arms fire. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

Sgt. William J. Beardsley, 25, of Coon Rapids, Minn., died Feb. 26 in Diwaniyah, Iraq, of wounds suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. Beardsley was assigned to the 260th Quartermaster Battalion, 3rd Sustainment Troop Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.
To  sign Sgt. William J. Beardsley's online Memorial guest book click here

Pvt. Kelly D. Youngblood, 19, of Mesa, Ariz., died Feb. 18 in Ramadi, Iraq, of wounds suffered during combat operations. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom. They died Feb. 2 in Ramadi, Iraq, of injuries sustained when they came in contact with enemy forces using small arms fire.
Killed were:
Spc. Alan E. McPeek, 20, of Tucson, Ariz.
He was assigned to the 16th Engineer Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Giessen, Germany.
Pvt. Matthew T. Zeimer, 18, of Glendive, Mont.
He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced Dec 4th, 2006 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Staff Sgt. John L. Hartman Jr., 39, of Tampa, Fla., died Nov. 30 in Baghdad, Iraq, of injuries suffered when an improvised explosive device detonated near his HMMWV during combat operations. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 9th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced Nov. 27th, 2006 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Pvt. Reece D. Moreno, 19, of Prescott, Ariz., died of injuries suffered in a non-combat related incident in Balad, Iraq, on Nov. 24. Moreno was assigned to the 92 Engineer Battalion, 3rd Sustainment Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga.

The Department of Defense announced Sept.25th, 2006 the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.
1st Lt. Ashley L. (Henderson) Huff, 23, of Belle Mead, N.J., died of injuries suffered in Mosul, Iraq, on Sept.19, when a suicide vehicle-borne improvised explosive device detonated near her mounted patrol during combat operations. Huff was assigned to the 549th Military Police Company, 385th Military Police Battalion, Fort Stewart, Ga.

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Former Army Chief of Staff
Frederick Weyand, dies at 93
He became commander of the 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment
and the assistant chief of staff, G–3, of the 3d Infantry Division
during the Korean War from 1950–1951.


Lieutenant General Weyand as Commander of II Field Force in Vietnam.

Place of birth          Arbuckle, California, September 15, 1916
Place of death         Honolulu, Hawaii, February 10, 2010

Survivors include Weyand's wife of 10 years, Mary, three children and four stepchildren.
A funeral service is scheduled for 3 p.m. Feb. 26 at Central Union Church. Burial will take place the following day at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

Service/branch        United States Army
Years of service      1938-1976
Rank                        General

Commands held       25th Infantry Division
                                  1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment
                                  Assistant Chief of Staff, G–3, of the 3d Infantry Division
                                  Commander of II Field Force in Vietnam
                                  Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
                                  U.S. Army, Pacific
                                  U.S. Army Chief of Staff

Battles/wars
World War II
Korean War
Vietnam War

Awards Distinguished Service Cross
Distinguished Service Medal(5)
Silver Star
Bronze Star (2)
Commander of the Legion of Merit

Early career
Weyand was commissioned a second lieutenant through the Reserve Officers Training Corps program at the University of California at Berkeley, where he graduated in May 1938. He married Arline Langhart in 1940.

World War Two
From 1940-1942 Weyand was assigned to active duty and served with the 6th Field Artillery. He graduated from the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth in 1942 and served as adjutant of the Harbor Defense Command in San Francisco from 1942–1943. He moved on to the Office of the Chief of Intelligence for the War Department General Staff in 1944. He became assistant chief of staff for intelligence in the China-Burma-India Theater from 1944–1945. In the immediate aftermath of the war he was in the Military Intelligence Service in Washington from

1945–1946
Service After World War Two and During the Korean War
He was chief of staff for intelligence, United States Army Forces, Middle Pacific from 1946–1949. He graduated from the U.S. Army Infantry School at Fort Benning in 1950. He became commander of the 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment and the assistant chief of staff, G–3, of the 3d Infantry Division during the Korean War from 1950–1951.

Prior to the Vietnam War
He served on the faculty of the Infantry School from 1952 to 1953. Following this assignment he attended the Armed Forces Staff College, and upon graduation became military assistant in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Financial Management until 1954. He moved on to become military assistant and executive to the Secretary of the Army from 1954 to 1957. He then graduated from the Army War College in 1958, moving on to command the 3d Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, in Europe, 1958–1959. He served in the Office of the United States Commander in Berlin in 1960 then became chief of staff for the Communications Zone, United States Army, Europe from 1960–1961;. He was the deputy chief and chief of legislative liaison for the Department of the Army from 1961–1964.

Vietnam War Service
Lieutenant General Weyand as Commander of II Field Force in Vietnam.
Weyand became commander of the 25th Infantry Division, stationed in Hawaii, in 1964. He continued to lead the division as it was introduced into operations in Vietnam in 1965 and 1966. He served as the head of the 25th Division until 1967, when he became deputy, then acting commander, and finally commander of II Field Force, Vietnam responsible for III Corps Tactical Zone comprising the 11 provinces around Saigon. In 1968, he became chief of the Office of Reserve Components.

A dissenter from General William Westmoreland's more conventional war strategy, Weyand's experience as a former intelligence officer gave him a sense of the enemy's intentions. He realized that "the key to success in Vietnam was in securing and pacifying the towns and villages of South Vietnam" (Mark Salter, John McCain "Hard Call: The Art of Great Decisions"). Weyand managed to convince a reluctant General Westmoreland to allow him to redeploy troops away from the Cambodian border area closer to Saigon, significantly contributing to making the 1968 Tet Offensive a military catastrophe for North Vietnam.

In 1969, he then was named the military advisor to Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge at the Paris Peace Talks. In 1970 he became assistant chief of staff for force development. Later in 1970, he became deputy commander and commander of the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. He succeeded General Creighton Abrams, who became the army Chief of Staff, as Commander of MACV on June 30, 1972. By the end of 1972 General Weyand had overseen the withdrawal of all United States military forces from South Vietnam

Post-Vietnam Commands and Chief of Staff
He was commander in chief of the United States Army, Pacific, 1973; was vice chief of staff of the United States Army, 1973–1974; was chief of staff of the United States Army, October 3, 1974–September 31, 1976; supervised Army moves to improve the combat-to-support troop ratio, to achieve a sixteen-division force, to enhance the effectiveness of roundout units, and to improve personnel and logistical readiness; retired from active service, October 1976.

Post Vietnam Personal Life
After retiring from the U.S. Army in 1976, Weyand made his home in Honolulu, Hawaii (which is also the home of the 25th Infantry Division). He became active in Hawaii community affairs and held a number of prominent business positions. He was an active member of the Rotary Club of Honolulu and a trustee of the now-dissolved Damon Estate, as well as the American Red Cross Hawaii Chapter, where he served as chairman of the board in 1992; the Sony Open golf tournament; Shriners Club; Association of the U.S. Army; the East-West Center; the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies; and Hawaii Theater.

Weyand died on February 10, 2010 at the Kahala Nui retirement residence in Honolulu, Hawaii. He is survived by his wife Mary Weyand, three children and five grandchildren.

He was a Footsie Britt  (At Large) member of the Society of the 3rd Division.

 

ALTON W. KNAPPENBERGER
Medal of Honor Recipient
Dec. 31, 1923 - June 9, 2008

 ALTON W. KNAPPENBERGER (1923-2008 )
CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENT

Alton W. was born 31 December 1923 in Cooperstown, Lehigh County, PA and died 9 June 2008. He was the son of Frank J. Knappenberger (1887-1928) and grandson of Clinton W. Knappenberger (born 7 August 1857) of Lehigh County, PA. He descends from Johan Michael Knappenberger (original immigrant) through his son Johan Henrich (Henry) Knappenberger who fought in the Revolutionary War. Alton was a Private First Class with the US Army, 3rd Infantry Division fighting in Italy on 1 February 1944 when his acts of bravery lead to receiving the Congressional Medal of Honor.

From his obituary:
Won Medal of Honor for WW2 valor, but lived quiet post war life in Earl Township, PA.
Alton W. Kappenberger, who was born in Coopersburg, worked on a pig farm and received the nations highest military honor during WW2., died of natural causes Monday at Pottstown Mem. Hosp. He was 84.
Pfc. Kappenberger, an army draftee, was awarded the MOH for acting with "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in his first and only combat experiences after the Allied landing at Anzio, Italy, in 1944.
He picked up a Browning automatic rifle, ran alone to a knoll and held off a German attack for more than two hours near Cristina di Larina, 30 miles from Nazi held Rome, on Feb. 1, 1944. The field was littered with 60 German dead.
Kappie as he was called, was a member of C company, 30th Inf. Regiment, 3rd. Inf. Div. His general called him a one man army. He went home in Aug. 1944 amid wide acclaim and pitched war bonds.
Throughout the rest of his life he shunned publicity and seeked a return to obscurity he drove a truck, laid blacktop and ran back-hoes.. He lived in a trailer in the woods of Earl Township.
Internment will be in Arlington National Cemetery.
 

Knappenberger, Alton W.

Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Cisterna di Littoria, Italy, 1 February 1944. Entered service at: Spring Mount, Pa. Birth: Cooperstown, Pa. G.O. No.: 41, 26 May 1944. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty in action involving actual conflict with the enemy, on 1 February 1944 near Cisterna di Littoria, Italy. When a heavy German counterattack was launched against his battalion, Pfc. Knappenberger crawled to an exposed knoll and went into position with his automatic rifle. An enemy machinegun 85 yards away opened fire, and bullets struck within 6 inches of him. Rising to a kneeling position, Pfc. Knappenberger opened fire on the hostile crew, knocked out the gun, killed 2 members of the crew, and wounded the third. While he fired at this hostile position, 2 Germans crawled to a point within 20 yards of the knoll and threw potato-masher grenades at him, but Pfc. Knappenberger killed them both with 1 burst from his automatic rifle. Later, a second machinegun opened fire upon his exposed position from a distance of 100 yards, and this weapon also was silenced by his well-aimed shots.

Shortly thereafter, an enemy 20mm. antiaircraft gun directed fire at him, and again Pfc. Knappenberger returned fire to wound 1 member of the hostile crew. Under tank and artillery shellfire, with shells bursting within 15 yards of him, he held his precarious position and fired at all enemy infantrymen armed with machine pistols and machineguns which he could locate. When his ammunition supply became exhausted, he crawled 15 yards forward through steady machinegun fire, removed rifle clips from the belt of a casualty, returned to his position and resumed firing to repel an assaulting German platoon armed with automatic weapons. Finally, his ammunition supply being completely exhausted, he rejoined his company. Pfc. Knappenberger's intrepid action disrupted the enemy attack for over 2 hours.

 

To Ken Hart Composer of the Song "Dogface Soldier"

On behalf of all the members of the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division, older veterans, newer veterans and current soldiers of the mighty 3rd Infantry Division, I want to commend you and Mr. Gold for all you have done for the foot soldier of all wars.

Your "Dogface Soldier" is as popular with the troops today as it was in WW II and the Korean War. I understand that a memorial to "Dogface Soldier" will be on display perpetually at the Kentucky History Center in Frankfort in honor of the song and its authors. What a magnificent tribute this is for you to know that you have contributed so much to the morale and pride of the many Rock of the Marne soldiers over the years.

Congratulations and appreciation for what you have done for us "Dogface Soldiers", we give you an honor of a big ''HOOAH'', which is the current Army salute for a 'job well done'.

Respectfully,
Jim Tiezzi, President
Society of the 3rd Infantry Division.

Ken Hart, in his mid eighties, one of the composers of "Dogface Soldier" would be so happy to hear from those who appreciate his and Mr. Gold's tribute to the red-blooded American Soldier., 
email him at... JaneHart22@hotmail.com It would uplift his day tremendously...
he is truly " The Walking Pride Of Uncle Sam " ... one of those who will never be replaced.

 



"I’m just a dog face soldier,
with a rifle on my shoulder."

"DOG FACE SOLDIER" 
Click on Link to hear the current version of the
 3D Infantry Division Song from the Fort Stewart Website.

So go the words of the division's theme song. Thanks to the creative genius of Walt Disney Productions, that "Dog Face Soldier" was caricatured into a tan bulldog: "heroic, but humble, fierce, but gentle, quick-witted and wise, with a confidence and dignity that comes from having proved himself."

Major General Albert O. Connor, a Third Division commander, visualized verbally what he wanted for a "Dog Face Soldier", Walt Disney Productions complied and the caricature was created.

All it cost was one dollar. The bull-dog face soldier is the result of an exchange of letters between General Connor and Walt Disney Productions. In one of his letters to Disney, General Connor explained: "For many years, the 3d Infantry Division has been seeking a trademark based on the symbolism of the "Dog Face Soldier." The term "dog face," he continued, "is an old one in our Army, dating back to the Indian Wars."

The division received the final design of the bull-dog face soldier in August 1965. Along with the drawing came a contract granting exclusive and perpetual right and license to reproduce the drawing. The one dollar bill provided by the Marne Association was autographed by the division's Sergeants Major. Along with the autographed bill, which was framed, a letter of thanks to Walt Disney and his staff was sent for bringing to life the verbal conception of a song.

 

I Wouldn't Give A Bean 
To Be A Fancy Pants Marine
I'd Rather Be A
Dog Face Soldier Like I Am

I Wouldn't Trade My Old OD's
For All The Navy's Dungarees
For I'm The Walking Pride
Of Uncle Sam

On All The Posters That I Read
It Says "Be All That You Can"
So They're Tearing Me Down
To Build Me Over Again

I'm Just A Dog Face Soldier
With A Rifle On My Shoulder
And I Eat Raw Meat
For Breakfast E'V'RY Day

So Feed Me Ammunition
Keep Me In The Third Division
Your Dog Face Soldier's A-Okay

Click Here to hear WWII version from the movie "To Hell and Back"

 

   

History of Veterans Day

1921 - an unknown World War I American soldier was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Similar ceremonies occurred earlier in England and France, where an unknown soldier was buried in each nation's highest place of honor (in England, Westminster Abbey; in France, the Arc de Triomphe).

These memorial services all took place on November 11, the anniversary of the end of World War I at 11:00 a.m., November 11, 1918 (the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month), which became known as Armistice Day.

1926 - Armistice Day officially became a holiday in the United States, and a national holiday 12 years later.

On June 1, 1954, the name was changed to Veterans Day to honor all U.S. veterans.

1968 - new legislation changed the national commemoration of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. It soon became apparent, however, that November 11 was a date of historic significance to many Americans. Therefore, in 1978 Congress returned the observance to its traditional date.

Official, national ceremonies for Veterans Day center around the Tomb of the Unknowns. To honor these men, symbolic of all Americans who gave their lives in all wars, an Army honor guard, the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment
(The Old Guard), keeps day and night vigil.

At 11 a.m. on November 11, a combined color guard representing all military services executes "Present Arms" at the tomb. The nation's tribute to its war dead is symbolized by the laying of a presidential wreath and the playing of "Taps."

 
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