3rd Division Photos
3rd Division & Society

2012 Events

Last Update December 01, 2013
 

Click on small photos for larger view


 
 
    Click on some Images  for larger view   

Email your photos (files) to rheller@warfoto.com 

Contents - Society of the 3ID Website

 

Go to 3rd Division Photos 3rd Division & Society 2013 Events
for Previously Reported Stories
3ID Photos - Active Division & Society 201
3

 

Korea revisit in November with David Mills as one of the veterans attending along with spouse Shirley, as well as the son and grandson of Sherm Pratt, long time Society member and well-known WWII veteran of the 3rd ID. 

Minister Park with veterans and families at Welcome Reception in Pusan
David Mills in front row.

Special Warfare command hosts UN Korean War Veterans
with David and Shirley Mills

Tim Stoy and Won SanJang Su Nim at Jogye Order Headquarters in Seoul


Outpost Europe Hosts Battle of the Colmar Pocket Historical Seminar and Commemorative Banquet 6-9 December 2012 in Arlington, VA


Battle of the Colmar Pocket Commemorative Banquet,
December 8, 2012

Colmar Pocket Commemoration at the 3ID Monument

Wreath Laying at  Tomb of the Unknowns with Col Aragones,Monika Stoy, MG Ramsey, and Marshall Soria

Visiting the Library of Congress

OP Europe conducted the third annual commemoration of the Battle of the Colmar Pocket between 6-9 December in Arlington, Virginia.   Eight WWII veterans participated: MG Lloyd B. Ramsey (3ID), John Keller (3ID), Elias Hernandez (3ID), Robert Ware Foster (168th Smoke Company attached to 3ID), Emery Antonucci (75th ID), Dr. Charles Phalen (3ID), Robert Phillips (28th ID), and Marshall Soria (28th ID).  The command group of the 75th Mission Command Training (successor to the 75th Infantry Division) headed by Commanding General Major General Jimmie Jaye Wells and Command Sergeant Major Ronnie Farmer participated in the event.  We were joined by two members of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club of the Military District of Washington, SFC Raphael Johnson and SSG Zinia Boswell.  Family members and children of our veterans participating included Tina Keller (John Keller’s daughter), Elena Gonzalez (Elias Hernandez’ daughter), Mike Golden, James Osborne (son of Paul E. Osborne, A/7th IN, 3ID), Annaliese Kieskowski (Charles Phalen’s daughter), Mario and Dolores Baraona (daughter and son-in-law of Marshall Soria), Tory Failzmegzer (nephew of Tommy Welch, 601st TD), Marjorie Phillips (wife of Robert), and Margaret Golden (wife of Mike).

Once again this year Craig Singhaus exhibited WWII military uniforms and equipment for our veterans to relive their youthful experiences with the cold weather they faced in the Colmar Pocket.  Joe Todisco, Korean War veteran from the 15th Infantry, joined us to assist at the registration desk and to honor our WWII veterans. 

The Mayor of Washington, D.C., Mayor Vincent Gray, and the Governor of Virginia, Governor Bob O’Donnell issued proclamations honoring the veterans of the Colmar Pocket, helping to educate their citizens on this forgotten battle and bringing recognition to our veterans

The evening saw continued presentations by COL Bob Samborski on the 75th ID’s role in the European theater and in the Colmar Pocket, Tim Stoy on the 3rd ID in the Colmar Pocket, Tory Failmezger on the fight at Maison Rouge, Dave Navarre on the 36th ID’s role, and each veteran recounted some of his experiences in the Colmar Pocket and in other stages of the war.

On Saturday morning the group moved to Arlington National Cemetery and honored the war dead by placing wreaths at the Tomb of the Unknowns and the 3rd ID Monument, and then concluded with a brief remembrance at Audie Murphy’s grave.  Due to the season there were very few people at the Tomb and it was a particularly solemn occasion as COL Aragones, Monika, MG Ramsey escorted by SFC Johnson, and Marshall Siora placed one wreath honoring all Colmar Pocket veterans, and MG Wells, BG Kasun, and COL Samborski placed a wreath in honor of the 75th ID.

Saturday evening we celebrated the commemorative banquet, with MG Wells serving as Keynote speaker and COL Jacques Aragones from the French Embassy speaking and presenting Mr. Emery Antonucci  the French Legion of Honor.  Commander Tory Failzmezger presided over the punch ceremony which resulted in a very palatable refreshment to liven our spirits.  It was a wonderful evening as Emery’s children and grandchildren joined him for this great occasion. Additionally Robert Ware Foster’s daughter Melody, son-in-law, and three grandsons attended. MG Wells was inspirational in his tribute to the veterans and COL Aragones aptly expressed his country’s and his own gratitude for the sacrifices and valor of the men who fought in the Colmar Pocket to liberate Alsace.  We were particularly honored that Tenor Paul McIlvane sang the US and French National Anthems and God Bless America for our event.  He did a terrific job and did so at late notice. 

The seminar concluded with final presentations Sunday morning, covering what the units did after the Colmar Pocket in the final campaign in Germany.  Mike Golden’s father commanded the hospitals which supported 7th Army in the Colmar Pocket campaign and he shared several of his father’s letters home which described the conditions in the battle. We were joined by COL, retired, Frank Cohn, a Battle of the Bulge veteran, who shared with us some of his experiences in the big battle which overshadowed Colmar.  James Osborne, first time attendee and son of deceased veteran, Paul E. Osborne, who served in A CO, 7th Infantry and received a Silver Star for actions on the Siegfried Line in March 1945, spoke of his father’s service and shared excerpts from his book on his father.  He was joined by his friend, John Reidy for the seminar and both brought fresh, Air Force, perspectives to the history of the Colmar Pocket.  SFC Johnson compared the cold weather equipment from WWII with that which our soldiers receive today and everyone had the opportunity to try on some of the gear on display.  We were all impressed with how heavy and scratchy the WWII gear is with all that wool!  It certainly must have remained quite wet once it got wet! 

The event was a great success, and we have already begun planning for next year’s event.  Please mark your calendars for 5-8 December 2013 here in Arlington, VA and plan to attend.  We will be commemorating the 69th anniversary of the fighting in Alsace!

MG Ramsey and James Osborne trying on WWII gear

Marne Men John Keller, MG Ramsey, Joe Todiso
and Eli Hrnandez during historical seminar

Ready for Cold Weather

WWII Veterans at Colmar Pocket Banquet

 


Megathlin: To Afghanistan, with love

from savannahnow.com
Carol Megathlin is a writer living in Savannah. She coordinates the Adopt-a-Soldier program.
Email her at carol.megathlin@comcast.net
Are you buying the dismissive, oft-repeated fib that “the war in Afghanistan is almost over”?

Try telling that to the thousands of 3rd Infantry Division troops who have been boarding planes for Afghanistan for the last couple of months. When those planes leave Hunter Army Air Field in Savannah, the soldiers on board won’t be back for nine long months. And when the soldiers arrive in country, the bad guys will still be trying to mow them down or blow them up.

The war is almost over? Oh, please.

The “end of 2014” is two years away.

In the next few weeks — right before Christmas for heaven’s sake — thousands of troops in the 3rd ID Combat Aviation Brigade will be leaving for the war zone. How can we in good conscience give them nothing more than a passing thought?

Actually, we can give them more — something personal and concrete that will work miracles for their morale.

Listen to this comment from former soldier Chris Stock, who fought in Desert Storm:

“Care packages from the states and from strangers were like manna from heaven. It meant even more because they weren’t family and had no reason to give you anything at all ... no obligation to support us, but they DID.

“By the hundreds of thousands, packages were sent all over the Middle East from fellow Americans at home. Watching that C130 fly over and drop a pallet of those for our little 150-man outpost in Zakho, Iraq, was sheer joy.

“These little gifts filled the space between sheer boredom and pure terror, and made life a little more bearable. I still appreciate them to this day.”

Chris’s dad is Don Stock of Tallahassee, Fla. Don has “adopted” two 3rd Infantry Division soldiers in Afghanistan. He sends them occasional care packages, he emails them hilarious stories about his fishing trips — like the time he accidentally set his shoe on fire with a can of sterno — and he has recruited his daughter’s second grade students to write them letters.

Don says, “I consider myself lucky to be a part of this effort.”

The best thing we can give our troops who are facing the possible loss of their lives is simple: To remember them. To let them know that we have not forgotten them as they lie down to an uneasy sleep in a hammered-together, sandbagged outpost in the remote reaches of Afghanistan.

Maj. Gen. Abe Abrams, the commanding general of the 3rd Infantry Division, recently sent me a list of addresses for six of the most austere, isolated combat outposts in his area of responsibility.

It’s not too late to get a Christmas package off to the guys posted in these places. It’s never too late.

Email me at carol.megathlin@comcast.net  and I’ll give you the addresses along with mailing instructions.

And if you want to adopt a soldier for the whole nine months, I’ll give you a soldier’s name, his or her email address and instructions for getting started. Check out our effort at www.adoptasoldier3id.com.

You don’t have to set your shoes on fire to make a soldier smile.

 

'Marne' Division Turns 95 Years
Photo by Sgt. Tara L. Cook, 3rd ID Public Affairs
Colonel John Hort and Command Sgt. Major Jimmy Pegues, rear detachment command team, cut a cake alongside Fort Stewart’s youngest and oldest Soldiers in celebration of the Third Infantry Division’s 95th birthday at a ceremony held at the Division Headquarters building Nov. 21.

 

The Battle of the Colmar Pocket Commemoration
at the Arlington National Cemetery on 8 Dec 2012

Battle of the Colmar Pocket Commemorative Banquet,
December 8, 2012

Colmar Pocket Commemoration at the 3ID Monument

Wreath Laying at  Tomb of the Unknowns with Col Aragones,Monika Stoy, MG Ramsey, and Marshall Soria

Visiting the Library of Congress

OP Europe conducted the third annual commemoration of the Battle of the Colmar Pocket between 6-9 December in Arlington, Virginia.   Eight WWII veterans participated: MG Lloyd B. Ramsey (3ID), John Keller (3ID), Elias Hernandez (3ID), Robert Ware Foster (168th Smoke Company attached to 3ID), Emery Antonucci (75th ID), Dr. Charles Phalen (3ID), Robert Phillips (28th ID), and Marshall Soria (28th ID).  The command group of the 75th Mission Command Training (successor to the 75th Infantry Division) headed by Commanding General Major General Jimmie Jaye Wells and Command Sergeant Major Ronnie Farmer participated in the event.  We were joined by two members of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club of the Military District of Washington, SFC Raphael Johnson and SSG Zinia Boswell.  Family members and children of our veterans participating included Tina Keller (John Keller’s daughter), Elena Gonzalez (Elias Hernandez’ daughter), Mike Golden, James Osborne (son of Paul E. Osborne, A/7th IN, 3ID), Annaliese Kieskowski (Charles Phalen’s daughter), Mario and Dolores Baraona (daughter and son-in-law of Marshall Soria), Tory Failzmegzer (nephew of Tommy Welch, 601st TD), Marjorie Phillips (wife of Robert), and Margaret Golden (wife of Mike).

Once again this year Craig Singhaus exhibited WWII military uniforms and equipment for our veterans to relive their youthful experiences with the cold weather they faced in the Colmar Pocket.  Joe Todisco, Korean War veteran from the 15th Infantry, joined us to assist at the registration desk and to honor our WWII veterans. 

The Mayor of Washington, D.C., Mayor Vincent Gray, and the Governor of Virginia, Governor Bob O’Donnell issued proclamations honoring the veterans of the Colmar Pocket, helping to educate their citizens on this forgotten battle and bringing recognition to our veterans

The evening saw continued presentations by COL Bob Samborski on the 75th ID’s role in the European theater and in the Colmar Pocket, Tim Stoy on the 3rd ID in the Colmar Pocket, Tory Failmezger on the fight at Maison Rouge, Dave Navarre on the 36th ID’s role, and each veteran recounted some of his experiences in the Colmar Pocket and in other stages of the war.

On Saturday morning the group moved to Arlington National Cemetery and honored the war dead by placing wreaths at the Tomb of the Unknowns and the 3rd ID Monument, and then concluded with a brief remembrance at Audie Murphy’s grave.  Due to the season there were very few people at the Tomb and it was a particularly solemn occasion as COL Aragones, Monika, MG Ramsey escorted by SFC Johnson, and Marshall Siora placed one wreath honoring all Colmar Pocket veterans, and MG Wells, BG Kasun, and COL Samborski placed a wreath in honor of the 75th ID.

Saturday evening we celebrated the commemorative banquet, with MG Wells serving as Keynote speaker and COL Jacques Aragones from the French Embassy speaking and presenting Mr. Emery Antonucci  the French Legion of Honor.  Commander Tory Failzmezger presided over the punch ceremony which resulted in a very palatable refreshment to liven our spirits.  It was a wonderful evening as Emery’s children and grandchildren joined him for this great occasion. Additionally Robert Ware Foster’s daughter Melody, son-in-law, and three grandsons attended. MG Wells was inspirational in his tribute to the veterans and COL Aragones aptly expressed his country’s and his own gratitude for the sacrifices and valor of the men who fought in the Colmar Pocket to liberate Alsace.  We were particularly honored that Tenor Paul McIlvane sang the US and French National Anthems and God Bless America for our event.  He did a terrific job and did so at late notice. 

The seminar concluded with final presentations Sunday morning, covering what the units did after the Colmar Pocket in the final campaign in Germany.  Mike Golden’s father commanded the hospitals which supported 7th Army in the Colmar Pocket campaign and he shared several of his father’s letters home which described the conditions in the battle. We were joined by COL, retired, Frank Cohn, a Battle of the Bulge veteran, who shared with us some of his experiences in the big battle which overshadowed Colmar.  James Osborne, first time attendee and son of deceased veteran, Paul E. Osborne, who served in A CO, 7th Infantry and received a Silver Star for actions on the Siegfried Line in March 1945, spoke of his father’s service and shared excerpts from his book on his father.  He was joined by his friend, John Reidy for the seminar and both brought fresh, Air Force, perspectives to the history of the Colmar Pocket.  SFC Johnson compared the cold weather equipment from WWII with that which our soldiers receive today and everyone had the opportunity to try on some of the gear on display.  We were all impressed with how heavy and scratchy the WWII gear is with all that wool!  It certainly must have remained quite wet once it got wet! 

The event was a great success, and we have already begun planning for next year’s event.  Please mark your calendars for 5-8 December 2013 here in Arlington, VA and plan to attend.  We will be commemorating the 69th anniversary of the fighting in Alsace!

MG Ramsey and James Osborne trying on WWII gear

Marne Men John Keller, MG Ramsey, Joe Todiso
and Eli Hrnandez during historical seminar

Ready for Cold Weather

WWII Veterans at Colmar Pocket Banquet

 

Society of the 3ID
Welcomes Two Medal Of Honor Recipients
To Society Membership
Read about their awards
   http://www.cmohs.org/
FOLEY, ROBERT F. Photo
Robert F. Foley
HAGEMEISTER, CHARLES CHRIS Photo
Charles C. Hagemeister


Outpost #7 Wreath Laying Ceremony
at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery
on Veterans Day Sunday, Nov 11, 2012
Oupost 7 upheld the tradition of recognizing VETERANS DAY by conducting an impressive wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery on Veterans Day Sunday, Nov 11, 2012. As hundreds of tourists looked on, John L. Insani and Pat Williamson, supported by wounded WW II Veteran Michael Halik (Co F 15th Inf ) Michael's daughter Debra Halik who helped her father navigate with his "walker" and Pat's daughter Holly Williamson, escorted by the Tomb Sgt of the Guard, placed a large wreath with blue and white flowers and a blue 3rd Inf Div banner at the Tomb. TAPS was then played by a bugler from the Army Band. Before and after the ceremony we met briefly with a group of French Army veterans who followed us in placing a wreath at the Tomb and who expressed their continuing high regard for the Marne Division.
Following the wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb, we moved from the amphitheater to the Third Infantry Division Monument where we placed a wreath, in the the shape and colors of our 3ID shoulder patch. Again, there were many cemetery visitors looking on who expressed their thanks for our service. Our group then moved to Audie Murphy's grave where we paid our respects, where we were again aproached by many visitors and where John, in response to many queries, answered many questions about the history of the Marne Division. The absence of many loyal members of OP 7 was attributed to a breakdown in the postal system where the OP's mass mailing "dropped through the cracks" and was returned too late to be corrected. Regrets, however, were received from Hank Bodson, George Otis and Tilly Smithers.

Call for nominations: In view of the departures of former president Dave Adams and his short term successor Scott Rubitsky, an urgent need exists to elect a new slate of officers for OP 7. I encourage OP 7 members to forget the old saying: "Never volunteer - to go on patrol" and instead, volunteer via a phone call or E Mail to me or to our National Secretary, Ray Anderson. Rock of the Marne"  

Rock of the Marne - Pat Williamson 

 

OP 15 Veterans Day

Outpost members Curtis Gentry (driver), Robert Johnson (passenger), and Donitza Williams (rear seat)

U.S. Senator-Elect Jeff Flake (R-Arizona)
(shown shaking hands with outpost member Bob Johnson with Curtis Gentry to the side)

Outpost 15 participated in one of the largest Veterans Day Parades in the United States in Phoenix, Arizona on Monday, November 12th.  Tens of thousands of spectators lined a two mile route on the streets of central Phoenix to view over one hundred entrants pass by eight reviewing stands in the Veterans Affairs Medical Center annual Phoenix Veterans Day Parade.  Entrants included Celebrity Grand Marshall Wayne Newton, U.S. Senator-Elect Jeff Flake (R-Arizona) (shown shaking hands with outpost member Bob Johnson with Curtis Gentry to the side), many military units, veterans and service organizations.  As the outpost 15 vehicle passed by each reviewing stand the following announcement was heard:

"This group represents Arizona Outpost #15 of the Society of the Third Infantry Division, U.S. Army.  The Third Infantry Division was activated in November 1917and has served in WWI, WWII, the Korean War, the Cold War, Persian Gulf War, and was the first U.S. Division to enter Baghdad during the 2003 invasion.  The Division has one of the most successful combat records and has paid a high price for this distinction suffering over 35,000 casualties and has fifty-one Medals of Honor awarded.  Members of Outpost 15 are military veterans, their families, friends and offers support, camaraderie and other benefits to the community."

Following the parade the Outpost had a meal at "A Touch Of Europe Cafe" in downtown Glendale.

The outpost looks forward to continuing its participation in this honored event.

Thank You,
Curtis Gentry
Secretary-Treasurer, OP 15
West-Region VP

Outpost 5845 Report

For the fourth year Outpost Europe teamed with the French Embassy in Washington, DC to honor the veterans of Operation Dragoon with historical seminars and a commemorative ceremony and banquet in Arlington, Virginia July 19-22.  Seven veterans received the French Legion of Honor from Colonel Brice Houdet, French Military Attaché, during the ceremony, including Society members MG John K. Singlaub for his service with the OSS in Southern France, Mr. Elias Hernandez with the 7th Infantry Regiment, Mr. Paul Donlon with the 30th Infantry Regiment, Mr. Mike Halik with the 15th Infantry Regiment, and Mr. Stanley Siemrzuch with the 39th Field Artillery received his medal posthumously as he passed away while his award was being processed. His son, Rich Siemrzuch accepted on his family’s behalf. 
We were honored to have been supported by the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club of the Military District of Washington, and to have MG Randy Manner representing the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, and MG Thomas Vandal representing the Chief of Staff of the Army as our guest speakers for the ceremony.
  CSM Edd Watson represented the CG, 3rd Infantry Division. COL Roger Donlon, US Army, retired, Congressional Medal of Honor, delivered wonderful comments at our dinner – he is the younger brother of Paul Donlon and he related how Paul had inspired him as a young boy his through example as a disciplined and sharp soldier.  Longtime Society member MG Lloyd B. Ramsey, retired, traveled from Roanoke to participate in the commemorations. 


Monika Stoy, Robert Jackson (45ID), Elias Hernandez (7th IN), Darryll Egner (517th PIR), Mike Halik (15th IN), Joe Ciccinelli (551st PIB), MG Lloyd Ramsey (7th IN), Jim Welsh (551st PIB), SGM Sam Magee (1st SSF), MG Jack Singlaub (OSS), Dr. John Carter (596th ABN ENG), COL Bill Ryan (15th IN) with members of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club of MDW, COL Brice Houdet, and COL (P) Randall Zeegers (Deputy CG, US Army Special Forces Command) in rear rank.

Grimaud Ceremony – Color bearer, Prefét du Var Monsieur Paul Mourier, Mayor Alain Benedetto, General Bernard Janvier, Monika Stoy, Mr. John Pollard (British Forces), Tim Stoy

Between 15 and 29 August the Stoys, representing Outpost Europe and the Society participated in 24 ceremonies commemorating Operation Dragoon and the liberation of Southern France.  It was a non-stop two weeks showing the colors in honor of our great veterans starting with 7 ceremonies on 15 August on the landing beaches.  Six communities dedicated commemorative plaques in honor of the 3rd Infantry Division this year – Grimaud, Le Barben, Lancon de Provence, Cadenet, Pourrieres, and Piolenc.  The community of Grimaud, 10 km inland from the landing beaches, dedicated a traffic circle honoring the 3rd Infantry Division. The ceremony was organized by retired French five-star General Bernard Janvier, who has fond memories of working with US Forces in Desert Storm and in the Balkans in the 90’s. 
We had the privilege of visiting the terrain where Audie Murphy fought and for which he received the Distinguished Service Cross. We were escorted by Monsieur Patrice de Colmont, the owner of the property and the proprietor of the famous Club 55 on Pampelonne Beach at Ramatuelle.
  Other communities included Ramatuelle, La Croix-Valmer, St. Tropez, Cavalaire-sur-Mer, Salon-de-Provence, Cavaillon, Orange, Bollene, Montelimar,  and Valreas, as well as Sauzet north of Montelimar (liberated by the 36th Infantry Division).  We can once again report that the citizens of Southern France remember our WWII veterans fondly and hope they will have the opportunity to express their gratitude personally whenever any of these veterans travel to Provence. 

 

Veterans Day Parade in Phoenix, AZ
It is with great pleasure to announce that outpost 15 has been accepted as an entrant in the VA Phoenix Veterans Day Parade.  I would like to encourage you to participate with the outpost in this event which has the theme:  Healing Wounds, Honoring Their Sacrifice.  This year, the outpost will have a vehicle in which to ride the two mile parade route.  The details are as follows:

When:  Monday, November 12, 2012

Meeting Place:  12025 N. 61 Drive, Glendale, AZ  (home of Curtis Gentry)

Time:  8:30 A.M. at which time we will depart to the staging area for the parade.  The parade will begin immediately after the Military fly-over at 11 a.m. We are required to report to the staging area no later than 9:45 so please don’t be late.

What to bring:  Please wear any hat or clothes that have the Society of the Third Infantry Division logo, which may be purchased on the Society web site.  Also, bring plenty of water as it may be warm.

RSVP is required so that we may plan for a light meal and outpost meeting at my home following the parade. 

Contact Information:  Curtis Gentry, 623-878-4623 or email at
curtis.gentry@gcmail.maricopa.edu

Thank You,
Curtis Gentry
Secretary-Treasurer, Outpost 15
West-Region Vice President, Society of the Third Infantry Division

 

3d Infantry Division hession bound book signed by Gen M.B. Ridgway.

I got this book at a charity shop in Cambridge a couple of year's ago. After looking through it I realised that a 3rd Division veteran from the Korean war would find it of interest. If anybody in your veterans society is interested could he contact me. I do not want any payment for it but I will expect the recipient to pay postage costs from England to the United States. The book is '3d Infantry Division in Korea' it is cloth bound, in good condition and signed by  Major General George W. Smythe.

Christopher Hull christopher.hull@hotmail.co.uk

 

Fort Stewart Patch
 Fort Stewart Soldiers Coming Home
About 100 Fort Stewart soldiers are heading home from their 9-month deployment to Afghanistan.
By Ryan Smith
October 9, 2012: About 100 3rd Infantry Division soldiers are returning home this week, according to a Fort Stewart press release.

Soldiers from 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, will be welcomed home Wednesday at a redeployment ceremony on Fort Stewart.

The ceremony is slated to begin at 10:55 a.m. at Fort Stewart's Cottrell Field.

About 100 Soldiers with the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd ID are returning from their 9-month deployment to Afghanistan.

Bob Bailey of OP 60
It is with a sad heart I must inform you that my father, Bob Bailey, passed away this morning at 0605. Please pass this on to all of your fellow 3rdID friends.
Bobby Bailey
September 13, 2012

Robert (Bob) Bailey, long time Secretary/Treasurer of OP 60, passed away this morning from a massive heart attack. Bob resided at 160 Huguley Road, Opelika, AL 36804. Funeral arrangements are with Vance Memorial Chapel Phenix City, AL.. Visitation will be at 4:00-6:00 PM Sunday 16 Sept and funeral 10:00 AM Monday 17 Sept at Vance Memorial Chapel, Phenix City, AL.. Burial will be at Fort Mitchell National Cemetery.

I just wanted to let you know the 3rd Brigade came through for my dad.  They will be at the cemetery for a full military honors ceremony.  My family really appreciates all the Society has done for my Dad, and for our troops.  You are all truly patriots and heros!  Thanks again

Bob (Bobby) Bailey Jr.
USAF, Retired
 


New Society of the 3ID Officers for 2012 - 2013
President = David Mills OP 15
Eastern Region Vice President = John Fisher OP5
Central Region Vice President = Matthew McKenna OP 13
Western Region Vice President = Curtis Gentry OP 15
Western Region Committeeman = James Strawn  OP 54

 

 

 

68th Anniversary of Operation Dragoon Marked with Historical Seminars, Commemorative Ceremony, and Banquet 19-22 July 2012


Host Monika Stoy with CSM Watson, MG Vandal, and Col Houdet

Introduction of Col Bill Ryan as 2nd longest officer
 in the history of the modern US Army
Arlington, Virginia – Outpost Europe of the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division hosted its fourth annual Operation Dragoon commemorative historical seminar and commemorative ceremony and banquet between 19 and 22 July 2012, honoring the veterans of the WWII invasion of Southern France. The venue was the Sheraton Pentagon City hotel in Arlington, Virginia.
15 World War II veterans from Operation Dragoon units participated:
Lieutenant General Richard J. Seitz, retired (517th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 1st Allied Airborne Task Force)
Major General Lloyd B. Ramsey, retired (7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division)
Major General John K. Singlaub, retired (Office of Strategic Services)
Colonel Gene Frice, retired (517th Parachute Infantry Regiment
Colonel William E. Ryan, Jr.; retired (15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division)
Dr. John Carter (596th Airborne Engineer Company, 1st Allied Airborne Task Force)
Mr. Paul Donlon (30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division)
Mr. Elias Hernandez (7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division)
Mr. Michael Halik (15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division)
Mr. Jim Welsh (551st Parachute Infantry Battalion, 1st Allied Airborne Task Force)
Mr. Daryll Egner (517th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 1st Allied Airborne Task Force)
Mr. Joe Cicchinelli (551st Parachute Infantry Battalion, 1st Allied Airborne Task Force)
Mr. Robert Jackson (179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division)
Mr. Robert Ware Foster (168th Chemical Smoke Company)
Sergeant Major William “Sam” Magee, Canadian Army, retired (1st Special Service Force)
        Joining the veterans were the family of Stanley Siemrzuch (39th Field Artillery, 3rd Infantry Division, an Operation Dragoon veteran who had attended previous events but who unfortunately passed away earlier this year. His son, Rich, accepted the French Legion of Honor on his father’s behalf during the commemorative ceremony. We were also joined by Mr. Stephen Gregg, Jr., son of 36th Infantry Division Medal of Honor Recipient SSG Stephen Gregg, Sr.. Numerous family members of all veterans were present. Colonel Roger Donlon, retired, Congressional Medal of Honor recipient from the Vietnam War, was present to honor his older brother, Paul Donlon.
       The event began with an opening historical seminar on Thursday evening covering the broader context in which Operation Dragoon took place. LTC Clayton Newell, retired, provided an overview of what was occurring in the European War in the period prior to and during Operation Dragoon and the Southern France Campaign. COL Brice Houdet, French Military Attaché, discussed the French Army’s role in Operation Dragoon, concentrating on the actions of the 3rd Division of Algerian Infantry which played a crucial role in the taking of Marseille. LTC Tim Stoy, retired, covered the German 19th Army.
     The following Friday morning continued the historical seminar, with presentations on naval operations by Captain, USNR, retired Wilbur Jones; air operations by Dr. Andrew Wackerfuss from the office of the historian of the US Air Force; and Airborne, OSS, and the First Special Service Force operations by Mr. Matt Seelinger, editor of On Point, the Journal of the Army Historical Foundation.
     A special treat followed as the group traveled to neighboring Fort Myer for a visit to the United States Army Band, where they viewed a film on the organization and mission of the band and were briefed by band personnel. Afterwards the group dined at the Fort Myer Officers Club.
     Rounding out the day’s historical seminars were presentations by LTC Stoy on the 3rd Infantry Division, followed by CDR, retired, Tory Failmezger who spoke about the 601st Tank Destroyer Battalion and his uncle, LT Tommy Welch who served in that unit. Mr. Dave Navarre covered the 36th Infantry Division, with Mr. Gregg showing a short interview of his father. Mr. Ian Cameron-Mowat from England provided an excellent overview on the British 2nd Parachute Brigade’s role with penetrating questions and insights into the controversy over whether they had or had not achieved their assigned mission and what their guidance had actually been. LTC, retired, Lee Yarborough spoke of the 509th Parachute Infantry Battalion in Operation Dragoon and about his father, LTG William Yarborough who helped plan the airborne portion of Dragoon. COL David Brown, historian for the 45th Infantry Division and director of the 45th Infantry Division Museum in Oklahoma provided a superb overview of the 45th Infantry Division in Dragoon.
      Saturday morning dawned gray and rainy, so the planned ceremony in the Memorial Amphitheater of Arlington National Cemetery was shifted to the Galaxy Ballroom of Sheraton Pentagon City. Situated on the 16th floor of the hotel with a panoramic view of Washington, DC, northern Virginia, and especially Arlington National Cemetery, it was an impressive site for the ceremony. Keynote speakers were Major General Randy Manner, acting Vice-Director of the National Guard Bureau, who represented General McKinley and Major General Thomas S. Vandal, Army Deputy G3/5/7, who represented the Army Chief of Staff, General Odierno. Colonel Brice Houdet represented the French Embassy delivering comments honoring all the veterans present. 7 members of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club of the Military District of Washington, led by Chapter President SFC Jessica Taylor, served as escorts for the six French Legion of Honor recipients and assisted in the Missing in Action/Prisoner of War ceremony while MSG Holcomb delivered the invocation. MSG William Hammond was assisted in the POW/MIA ceremony by his daughters Kayla and Brianna. Command Sergeant Major Edd Watson, CSM of the 3rd Infantry Division and representing Sergeant Major of the Army Chandler, narrated the POW/MIA ceremony. Brigadier General Moore, Assistant Adjutant General of the Oklahoma National Guard represented his state in honor of the 45th Infantry Division. The highlight of the ceremony was the presentation of the French Legion of Honor to MG Singlaub, Mr. Egner, Mr. Halik, Mr. Hernandez, and Mr. Paul Donlon, and to Rich Siemrzuch in honor of his father, Stanley.

     Despite the intermittent rain, COL Zeegers, MG Singlaub, Elias Hernandez, COL Ryan, BG Moore, COL Houdet, CSM Magee, COL Donlon,and Mr. Lucien Stervinou (a French WWII veteran and President of the DC area French veterans association) and bus full of other veterans and guests drove to Arlington National Cemetery and placed wreaths at the Tomb of the Unknowns – COL Houdet, Monika Stoy, COL Ryan, and Mr. Stervinou on behalf of the Republic of France; BG Moore, Elias Hernandez, Tim Stoy, and Mr. Stephen Gregg, Jr. on behalf of the 3rd , 36th and 45th Infantry Divisions; COL Zeegers, MG Singlaub, COL Roger Donlon, and CSM Sam Magee on behalf of Special Forces.
    
     On Saturday evening 93 persons attended the commemorative banquet. COL Randall Zeegers, Deputy Commanding General of the US Army Special Forces Command gave a presentation on the Special Forces Regiment, COL David Brown briefed on today’s 45th Infantry Brigade, CSM Watson briefed on the 3rd Infantry Division, and COL Houdet provided an overview of the French Army today. Especially poignant was COL Roger Donlon’s tribute to his older brother, Paul, and the role Paul played as a role model for Roger and the rest of the family. The daughters of Elias Hernandez also delivered a fun and moving tribute to their father.
On a more somber note, we remembered previous Operation Dragoon commemoration participants who have passed away – Stanley Siemrzuch, Floyd Kruszka, John Lodatto, and Al Hoffman. We had received word from Al’s son the evening before the beginning of the seminar of his father’s passing.

    During the banquet Colonel Houdet was called forward along with all other Infantrymen present. He was then decorated with the Peregrinus Level of the Order of St Maurice by Monika Stoy while Tim read the citation. COL Houdet received this prestigious award for his outstanding support in honoring WWII American Infantrymen the past four years in historical commemorations for the Battle of the Colmar Pocket, Operation Dragoon, and assisting in the processing of French Legion of Honor award packets for over 100 deserving veterans.
   The four day event concluded with final historical sessions on Sunday morning – the 3rd Infantry Division’s operations after the Southern France campaign and the 45th Infantry Division’s operations in the second half of the Southern France campaign. All remaining participants shared their final observations and recollections on their experiences in Dragoon and during the war. Major General Singlaub gave closing comments after sharing his recollections from his time with the OSS in France and how he was repatriated once Southern France was liberated.
     Once again the Sheraton Pentagon City hotel provided excellent support and service, making this year’s Operation Dragoon commemoration the best yet. Their ability to react to the change of ceremony venue due to inclement weather was remarkable. All participants expressed their great satisfaction with the event and their plans to attend again next year so Outpost Europe is already planning for the 69th anniversary commemoration in August 2013!

 

Korean War Vet’s Memories Vivid of Time Spent as POW
By Terri Moon Cronk
American Forces Press Service
United States Department of Defense

David Mills, 76, holds his certificate for the Purple Heart, which he received 57 years
after he was repatriated by the Chinese in 1953 as a prisoner during the Korean War.
DOD photo by Terri Moon Cronk

The attached link to the DVIDhub Website contains a video of the 59th Anniversary Commemoration Ceremony of the signing of the Armistice of the Korean War in 1953, which was held in Arlington National Cemetery on July 27, 2012.    David was among the speakers personally invited by the Secretary of Defense and introduced as being from the Third Infantry Division.    

David's remarks begin at about the 24 minute mark and run for seven minutes.  Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta was the keynote speaker and referenced him personally during his speech, the only reference to a Korean Vet by name. The entire video is 71 minutes long and includes a wreathe laying ceremony at the Tomb of The Unknowns.   

http://www.dvidshub.net/video/150336/korean-war-armistice-ceremony#.UBNDoI59nzI


WASHINGTON, July 24, 2012 – When infantryman David Mills joined the Army on his 17th birthday and was sent to fight in the Korean War, his mission was to hold Outpost Harry “at all costs.” Mills, now 76, says those orders came from 8th Army on April 2, 1953, to stave off enemy Chinese troops from the strategically placed outpost in the Iron Triangle, about 50 miles from Seoul at the 38th parallel, which divided North and South Korea. The outpost was close to Chinese lines. The Chinese had “an affinity” for Outpost Harry, said Mills, a member of Company F, 15th Infantry Regiment of the 3rd Infantry Division.

“They came to ‘visit’ us often and fought ferociously,” he said. “They tried [several times] to take it. Had it fallen, with its high elevation, it would’ve made it difficult for the main line of resistance to remain where it was. [We] perhaps would’ve had to withdraw as far back as Seoul, which no doubt would have extended the war for quite some time.” It was unlikely the United States would have accepted a cease fire with the capital of South Korea under Chinese control at that time, he added, so it was important for American troops to hold the outpost’s position. But on April 24, Chinese troops nearly took Outpost Harry.

“We had 88 men holding the outpost,” he said. “The attack was ferocious. We were overrun. Hand-to-hand fighting occurred in all of the trenches, and very heavy losses were suffered on both sides.” The forward observer from the 39th Field Artillery called for backup artillery to stop the attack, which was successful, he said. But things didn’t turn out as well that day for Mills, who received nine wounds -- two in the head, six in the leg and one in the left arm. During what Mills described as very close fighting with hand grenades and bayonets, his weapon overheated and became inoperable. While searching for another, he crawled on his stomach to the entrance of a bunker about 30 yards away.

“Nobody was in there,” he said. “I reached in to grab a rifle, and I felt something poke me in my back. I backed out very slowly and turned over, and was looking at the muzzle of a Russian-made submachine gun.” Three Chinese soldiers stood over him, Mills said. One held the gun, and the other two carried six grenades each, three on each side of their chests, he said. “I thought I was going to die,” Mills recalled reciting a short prayer as he looked up at the barrel of the weapon. “I was ready to die,” he said. “Then I had an immediate second thought. I was 17 years old, and I thought, ‘How are my parents going to take this?’ And I thought, maybe, I could get the weapon away from that soldier, and kill all three of them. Then I had a rational thought: He had his finger on the trigger and the likelihood of me being successful was rather slim. I lay there until they picked me up.” As the captors walked him to a Chinese camp, Mills saw the dead everywhere. “There were many Americans, but many more Chinese,” he said.

As the soldiers roughed him up and forced him down hilly terrain, Mills said he felt no pain and wasn’t aware he was wounded. “Each time we got to the top of a rise, they’d hit me between the shoulder blades with the butt of the weapon, and I’d go tumbling down the hill. After the third time, my leg felt funny and I had difficulty maintaining balance,” Mills recalled. It was when he felt blood running down his neck that he knew he’d been hit. “Eventually, I half-crawled and was half-dragged to a cave, in which I spent the first night of my captivity,” he said. Mills found himself next to a Chinese soldier who had three bullet holes in his stomach. “I could hear bubbles as the air escaped [from his wounds],” he said. “He died during the night.”

The next morning, the Chinese soldiers took Mills from the cave and repeatedly prodded him with a rifle to make him walk up a road, but by then he was in such pain from his injuries, he couldn’t walk. “They pointed to a rock for me to sit down on, went around the corner,” Mills said. “I thought I was going to be executed.” Instead, he said, four Chinese soldiers came around the corner with a stretcher, put him on it and carried him for seven days to a place Mills estimated to be 30 to 50 miles behind the lines.
“I was placed in a dungeon not high enough for me to stand, or long enough for me to stretch out straight,” he said. He couldn’t eat for two weeks. Knowing he would die of starvation otherwise, Mills said he forced himself to eat.

Rain poured into the dungeon. “I spent a lot of my time snapping the backs off lice,” Mills said of his confinement. “My leg hurt so bad, I asked them to cut it off. They sent someone to look at it. I don’t know if he was a doctor … he just looked at it, and [now] I’m glad they didn’t acquiesce to my request.” After enough prisoners of war to fill an army truck were brought in, they were taken to a prisoner camp, Mills said. Still not treated for his wounds, with bullets and shrapnel intact, Mills said he was not made to do hard labor like the other prisoners.

During his four-month captivity “the 15th Infantry Regiment with its company-sized outpost decimated the entire 74th Chinese Infantry Division, killing more than 5,000 of them,” Mills said. “There were very heavy American losses, but we held that hill.” Four months to the day after he was taken prisoner, the Chinese repatriated Mills and the other POWs on Aug. 24, 1953. His family didn’t know he was alive, Mills said, and initially were told he was killed in action. Mills said he has copies of his two published obituaries. Reflecting on that April day in 1953 when the outpost was attacked, Mills said he was the last soldier, U.S. or Chinese, on the hill firing a weapon. “I’ve often wondered if I was captured with an empty gun,” he said. He also thought he was likely the only survivor of the attack, until decades later when he found the Outpost Harry Survivors Association and similar groups.

For being wounded during combat Mills received the Purple Heart, but it took 57 years, because of omissions in his paperwork, he said. Mills said his initial discharge papers indicated he’d served overseas, but they didn’t say where, and didn’t note that he’d been wounded, had served in combat, or been taken as a POW. Knowing he was eligible for the Purple Heart, Mills’ daughter set out to find and correct her father’s records. After hearing his records likely had burned in a fire in a St. Louis military repository, Mills’ papers were found archived in Philadelphia. The paperwork was corrected, and the award was approved in nine short days, Mills said. Then-Vice Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Peter W. Chiarelli presented Mills with his Purple Heart in 2010. “To receive [the Purple Heart] from General Chiarelli was worth the wait,” Mills said.
Although the Korean War is sometimes called “The Forgotten War,” Mills said that was not his experience. Upon his enlistment in the Army, Mills recalled that he “wanted to see the world.” “And I did. A small part of it,” he said.

David is the new President of the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division commencing in September at the 92nd Reunion in Savannah.

 

A Cause Greater than Self:
The Journey of Captain Michael J. Daly,
World War II Medal of Honor Recipient
(Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series)

by Stephen J. Ochs (Sep 1, 2012)

My book on Captain Michael J. Daly of A Company, 15th Infantry Regiment, who received the Medal of Honor for his actions on April 18, 1945, in Nuremberg will be released on September 1. It is published by Texas A&M University Press and is entitled A Cause Greater Than Self: The Journey of Michael J. Daly, WWII Medal of Honor Recipient. It is available at Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble.com As you know, I had the privilege of interviewing Mike Daly many times. He and I became good friends and we spoke three or four times a week over the course of a six year period. He was one of the best men I have ever known. In eleven months of combat from Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, to April 19, 1945 in Nuremberg where he was severely wounded, Mike's gallantry resulted in two Purple Hearts, a Bronze Star with "V" for valor, three Silver Stars, the Medal of Honor and went from private to captain and company commander. And all before reaching the age of twenty-one! A Company became known as "Daly Company" in his honor. I hope that you enjoy the book and that I do justice to Mike's memory. Thank you for all of your help on this project.
P.S. My Facebook site has a lot of information about Mike and the book, including many photographs. You can view it at Steve Ochs   https://www.facebook.com/#!/steve.ochs.14

 

World War II Veterans Honored for Their Part in Operation Dragoon
By Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.
American Forces Press Service
U.S. Army World War II veterans of Operation Dragood and Members of the Military District of Washington’s Sgt. Audie L. Murphy Club, the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division, and the military attaché to the French Embassy pose following a remembrance ceremony honoring the success of Operation “Dragoon” held Arlington, Va., July 21, 2012.
DOD photo by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.
WASHINGTON, July 22, 2012 – A group of World War II veterans was recognized yesterday in a ceremony held here for their gallantry during a 1944 combat operation in southern France.

Operation Dragoon lasted from Aug. 15 until Sept. 14, 1944. It was the second largest amphibious invasion of World War II, with over 1,000 ships delivering three divisions of troops to the beaches of France. Additionally, an airborne division parachuted into the country to help secure beach heads along with Greek, Polish and Dutch forces, according to retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. Timothy Stoy, historian for the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division.

The Society of the 3rd Infantry Division hosted the ceremony honoring veterans who fought during the operation. French Army Col. Brice Houdet, military attaché from the French Embassy, presented the French Legion of Honor during the ceremony to retired U.S. soldiers John Singlaub, Paul Donlon, Darryl Egner, Elias Hernandez, Michael Halik and the son of Stanley Siemrzuch. Before presenting the French awards, Houdet thanked the group of veterans on behalf of the people of France.
“I would like to salute all of the American allied veterans who took part in that momentous operation 68 years ago,” he said. “We are deeply honored to have some of you with us today.”
“I will have the distinct honor to present six of these highly deserving former service members with the Legion of Honor, France’s highest national honor and distinction, for their outstanding services during World War II,” Houdet said.
The six award recipients were all accompanied by members of the Military District of Washington’s Sgt. Audie L. Murphy Club, representing the connection to Murphy and the 3rd Infantry Division in which he served.

During the ceremony, U.S. Army Command Sgt. Maj. Edd Watson, currently the command sergeant major of the 3rd Infantry Division, narrated a Missing in Action presentation, and explained the items on a table displayed to honor fallen soldiers. U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Randy E. Manner, Joint Staff director for the chief of the National Guard Bureau, said Operation Dragoon may not be as well known as some other World War II operations, but it should be remembered for its strategic importance.

“Sometimes, the voice of history does not speak as loudly about some events such as Operation Dragoon,” Manner said. “So that’s our job today … to be that voice and to speak loudly about those great successes all those many years ago,” he said. “Those gathered here … know the strategic value of Operation Dragoon.”

Manner, whose father served under Singlaub, a retired Army major general, noted Operation Dragoon was critical because it opened a much-needed supply line into France for the allies to “continue to smash the Nazis.” “History records that over 90,000 soldiers and over 11,000 vehicles were on the beach, on the ground, within days,” he said. “The bottom line is the operation significantly contributed to the shortening of the war in Europe, which meant, of course, the shortening and the lessening of the number of lives that were lost and the number of the families that were affected.”

U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Thomas S. Vandal, director of operations, readiness and mobilization for the Department of the Army, thanked all of the veterans present for their sacrifice and “tremendous” service to the country. “Although not as well known as Operation Overlord, Operation Dragoon was a highlight of the second World War for many in our military,” he said. “[It was] one of the most successful combined joint operations in the European theater.

“Today, we take fighting as a joint team, alongside our sister services, for granted, just as we’ve come to count on our multi-national allies to be there in operations around the world today,” Vandal said. “But on Aug. 15, 1944, in the early days of the liberation of Europe, such a level of cooperation was far from commonplace.” Vandal called the allied forces a “vanguard” of history who forged a path “for all of us to follow.”
“Some historians have mistakenly called Operation Dragoon the ‘forgotten D-Day,’ particularly in comparison to the larger and more famous invasions of Normandy,” he said. “In fact, some have even gone so far as to imply that the operation was easy – merely a cakewalk.
“Sgt. Audie Murphy, from the 3rd Infantry Division, might disagree with this characterization,” Vandal said. “Given that he earned a Distinguished Service Cross during Operation Dragoon, I think it speaks for itself [and what troops] did.”
Vandal noted allied forces of Operation Dragoon advanced more than 500 miles in less than a month and took more than 100,000 Germans prisoner.
“Overlooked by history or not, Operation Dragoon was a pivotal moment in the history of France, a fact well understood by all of you veterans sitting here today,” he said.
Vandal, a former member of 3rd Infantry Division himself, expressed his appreciate for all World War II veterans.
“All of our veterans are a national treasure, and we are all fortunate to be in their presence,” he said. “They have left a legacy for our Army and our nation to follow.”

 



Rock of the Marne 

Eric Vandroux

 

France honors 5 WWII vets at West Point
16 soldiers from New Jersey honored at West Point
One of the recipients was WILLIAM M DIRIENZO, a member of OP 5, Society of the 3rd Infantry Division.

WWII Veteran William Dirienzo of Toms River is embraced by Guy Wildenstein, president of the American Society of the French Legion of Honor.
 Bob Karp/Staff Photographer
On May 8th, 2012, the Ambassador of France, Francois Delattre, bestowed the Legion of Honor on 38 World War II vets at West Point, NY.

Francois Delattre, French ambassador to the United States, awarded the insignia of the French Legion of Honor to 39 American World War II veterans, 16 of them from New Jersey, on Tuesday.

Guy Wildenstein, president of the American Society of the French Legion of Honor, helped make the presentations at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.

“We have chosen West Point as the site of the ceremony for its historically symbolic character,” Delattre said, “as it was established on the banks of the Hudson in 1802 — the same year the Legion of Honor was founded, and 20 years after the American War of Independence, in which the French also took part.

“The oldest military academy in the United States has trained many officers who fought on French soil in both world wars,” the ambassador said. “Bestowing the Legion of Honor decorations at West Point is here to remind us of the link between generations of soldiers.”

One of the recipients was WILLIAM M DIRIENZO, a member of OP 5, Society of the 3rd Infantry Division.
At the reception following the ceremony, LT Gen D.H. Hutton, Superintentendant at West Point, noticed the 3rd Division insignia on Direnzo's lapel. He told him he was in the 3ID during the Gulf War. With that, he asked if he remembered "Dog Face Soldier" and they sang it to Direnzo's family..
Copyright © 2012 www.MyCentralJersey.com. All rights reserved.

 

Third Infantry Division Monument
 Fort Benning, GA
With the construction of the new Infantry Museum at Fort Benning, our beautiful Third Infantry Division Monument has been left behind at the old Infantry Museum location. This monument honors the 3rd Infantry Division and was dedicated during the Society of the Third Infantry Division Reunion at Ft. Benning in 1992. There is a place set aside at the new museum for the monuments from the old location.

It is estimated the cost for moving our monument and setting it in the new location will be about $8,000. If every active duty Soldier and all Veterans could give from $1.00 to $10.00 each, we would have the
funds to move the monument. It is possible that we could receive enough donations to add another wing to honor our Soldiers who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Eight thousand of us each giving a dollar would cover the cost. Giving a bit more will insure the success of the fundraising effort, and will conclude the fundraising as soon as possible. The sooner we move the monument the better will be our location at the new museum.

To help, please send your contribution, identified as “Benning Monument Move” to:

Ray Anderson,
10 Paddington Ct.
Hockessin, DE 19707-9766
 

Thank you for your help.
—Bob Bailey, Chair of the Monument Moving Committee

 

Third Infantry Division Monument
 Fort Benning, GA
May 23, 2012: Re-Dedication of the 3rd Division Monument at the Field of Honor behind the National Infantry Museum at 1000 hrs  Fort Benning, GA and Outpost 60 Meeting.

Major Irvin and Bob Bailey
I was glad to be able to make it to the monument and getting to make final arrangements with Maj Irving for the re-dedication services.

Robert and Mary Anne Bailey
The 3rd Infantry Division Monument installation at Fort Benning was completed on Friday, April 13th. I want to thank Bob Poydasheff and Major Irving who helped me to make this project of moving this monument to it's new home in front of the new Infantry Museum. For those that sent donations from $1.00 up to $100.00, we the monument committee want to thank you all very much. The monument looks very good in its new home. It will get to be seen by many more people then ever now. Re-dedication services are set for May 23rd at 1000 hrs in front of the Infantry Museum. This re-dedication will also be in place of the regular OP 60 meeting.
Thanks
Rock of the Marne
Bob Bailey

 

Third Infantry Division Monument Transplanted
Posted: Apr 19, 2012
http://www.wltz.com/story/17586084/third-infantry-division-monument-transplated
FORT BENNING, Ga.- The 3rd Infantry Division monument was transplanted to the Walk of Honor on the grounds of the new National Infantry Museum at Fort Benning, Ga., Wednesday, April 11, 2012.
Three pieces of granite commemorate the memory of all who served, fought, were killed, wounded, captured, or missing while serving their country during World War I, World War II and the Korean War.
The monument was moved by Columbus Monument Company from its former site at Sacrifice Field, at the old National Infantry Museum, to its new location. "The cost of this project was $3,750," said Lynn Weekley, memorial consultant for Columbus Monument Company. "The total cost included the disassembly, transportation, and reassembly of the monument."

The monument was originally dedicated in 1994 and placed at Sacrifice Field. The monument had been under a tree and was placed directly on the ground at its old site, and was in need of refurbishing, said Weekley. Part of the cost for the project was for cleaning, repainting, cutting the bases of the monument to fit better, and a new bronze plaque.

The National Infantry Museum, which replaced the now closed, smaller museum, opened the Walk of Honor in 2010. The 3rd Infantry Division monument is one of two monuments that were erected Wednesday at the Walk of Honor.
Finishing touches were completed April 15, and the monument is scheduled to be rededicated during a ceremony May 23.

(SOURCE: FT. BENNING)
Left to right, Rick Sawyer, Roy Ware, Alan Bowser, Lindsey Clark and Lynn Weekley, members of Columbus Monument Company, moved the 3rd Infantry Division Monument to the National Infantry Museum. (Source: 3rd Infantry Division)
Powered by WorldNow All content © Copyright 2000 - 2012 WorldNow and WLTZ. All Rights Reserved.


I'm going to forward you an emailed photo of me at a Patriot Guard (motorcycle) Riders mission. The mission was to see a WWII Army-Airforce veteran off on a special trip to Washington D.C. Called "Honor Flight". The Patriot Guard leader asked all motorcycle groups to introduce themselves. I represented the Marne Riders and I gave a brief history of the Society of the Third Infantry Division.
Lou Bravos, OP 22

 

MG Ramsey's Visit to Europe in May

Bad Bruekenau with Col Rohrmueller, MG Ramsey, Bob Dutil, Mrs Rohrmueller and the Stoys

Obersazburg front row,
Dr Schaden, Gen Ham, Bob dutil, Dr Bernhard, Upper Bavaria Governor Hillenbrand, Monika Stoy and MG Ramsey

Nuernberg, Dr Dietzfelbringer, Bob Dutil, MG Ramsey and Monika with the plaque on the Zeppekin Field Tribune

 

A Memorial Day Ceremony held at the Sledgehammer Brigade conducted on Thursday May 24th at the 3RD HBCT Memorial adjacent to Brigade Headquarters.
This  honored fallen Sledgehammer Soldiers.
Third Brigade to deploy next month
Posted: May 23, 2012

Ft. Benning, GA - The Third Heavy Brigade Combat Team, Third Infantry Division rededicates its monument to the Third Infantry Division in a ceremony this morning. This coming on the eve of yet another deployment.

The rededication took place at Monument Park which is next to the Parade Field at the National Infantry Museum.
The Third ID monument moved from Kelly Hill to its new home.

We spoke with Third Brigade Commander, Colonel Johnnie Johnson about the soldiers' upcoming deployment.
Col. Johnson says, "On the eve of our deployment, at least for 3rd Brigade, that's coming up next month what a better way to look ahead because in order to appreciate what you're going to do in the future in defense of our nation, we must always reflect on our past and what we've already done."

Colonel Johnson declined to say where the Third Brigade is deploying to.
According to a post on the Third Brigade's Facebook page they are heading somewhere in southwest Asia.
Powered by WorldNow All content © Copyright 2000 - 2012 WorldNow and WLTZ. All Rights Reserved.

Col. Johnnie L. Johnson, Jr., right, the 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team Brigade Commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. Brian D. Harrison, left, the 3rd HBCT Command Sgt. Maj., place a wreath at the Fallen Heroes Memorial on Kelley Hill during memorial ceremonies Thursday. The 78 names etched on the memorial, including one civilian and two Allied Forces troops, were read aloud. 05.24.12 BY ROBIN TRIMARCHI —
Robin Trimarchi rtrimarchi@ledger-enquirer.com

 

Friends of the 3rd ID

We have an opportunity to support the division HQ before they deploy. The 2012 Division Ball will be Friday, June 29th, at the Savannah International Trade and Convention Center. It will be the culminating event of Marne Week, which will occur the week of June 25th – 29th. According to the action officer for the ball, “the Purpose and Concept of the Ball is as follows: P: The 3rd Infantry Division Celebrates 95 years of service to the nation, builds unit cohesion and esprit de corps, and expresses gratitude to our extended family – spouses, veterans, community leaders and civilians – as we prepare to deploy to Afghanistan and continue to build upon the Division’s legacy. C: The 3rd Infantry Division conducts Marne Week from 25 – 29 June to build esprit de corps through sports competition and individual health awareness with a strong family atmosphere. Marne Week will culminate with an All-Ranks Ball on 29 June at the Savannah International Trade and Convention Center.”

Folks, there exists a non-interest bearing account for the duration of the planning through the execution of the Ball at Heritage Bank (the account was opened by the division action officer). The name of the account is 3rd Infantry Division Ball. I recommend that we put out to the appropriate veterans, alumni and friends of the Division that this account exists if they were inclined to make a monetary donation or the donation of goods/services as raffle prizes. All funds and donations received – 100% - will be used to defray the cost of tickets to Soldiers that would like to attend. Of course, donations go towards defraying costs (supports defraying junior grade Solders costs).

The 3rd ID Society and the local chapter SGM Association donating funds to the division for their upcoming Division Ball occurring 29 June 2012. All funds go to defray junior enlisted ticket costs.

Note that the Division HQ and several Battalions will be deploying this

Summer, so this ball is a morale booster in preparation for deployment. Here

is the breakdown for contributions.

 

Ft. Stewart SGM Association $1000

3rd ID Society $100

Marne Association $3000

 

I can tell you that the division command was very appreciative of our

donations and support...more to follow on this in days to come...

 

Regards,

Ray Egan
Society of the 3rd ID LNO
912-435-9966

 

Ceremonies on 8th May 2012

Please, see the attached photos of our distinguished veterans-MG Lloyd Ramsey and Mr Robert Dutil in Kientzheim and Ostheim near Colmar, France. They both did exceptionally well during this trip. We thank them for their service 68 years ago and for their visit to Europe this time. They were well received everywhere we visited. In addition to our 3rd ID sector, we visited the 28th ID sector as well.
Rock of the Marne!
Monika

Major General Lloyd B. Ramsey
Leaving for Europe for End of WWII Commemorations

At 94 years of age, MG Ramsey will visit Germany, Austria, and France between 30 April and 10 May to participate in commemorative ceremonies in Bad Brueckenau and the Obersalzberg, Germany; Salzburg, Austria; and Colmar, Sigolsheim, Ammerschwihr, and Ostheim, France.  He will also visit Nuernberg to see the tablet at the Zeppelin Field tribune which was dedicated last year and plans to visit Lorraine American Cemetery at Saint Avold.  He is being escorted by OP Europe President Monika and 15th Infantry Regiment Association President Tim Stoy and is being joined by Mr. Bob Dutil, who served in the 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry when then LTC Ramsey was the battalion commander. The group is a delegation representing the Society and Outpost Europe at these locations.

            The major highlight of the trip will be MG Ramsey’s participation in Outpost Europe’s 5th annual commemorative ceremony on 5 May on the Obersalzberg.  MG Ramsey was instrumental in the 3rd Infantry Division’s winning the race to Berchtesgaden, finding the only remaining operational bridge through personal reconnaissance which enabled the 7th Infantry Regiment’s 1st and 3rd Battalions to drive on to the much desired objective.  He was also the man posted by MG O’Daniel at that bridge to prevent other units from crossing it until the 7th Infantry Regiment had secured the objective.  He was also at the Flag Raising on 5 May and is prominent in the famous photo of that event.  The guest speakers for that event are General Carter Ham, Commanding General of US Africa Command and President Christian Hillenbrand, the President of the government of Upper Bavaria.

            This will be MG Ramsey’s first visit to these areas since WWII and the communities are very pleased to have such a distinguished visitor visiting them for these historic commemorations.  Bob Dutil was present at the dedication of the 3ID tablet on the Obersalzberg in 2008 and this will be his fourth time returning to Europe.


Bertha Rosson, MG Ramsey, Tim, Bob Dutil, Monika in
MG Ramsey’s apartment in Roanoke prior to departure

The 3rd ID Memorial Tablet on the Obersalzberg

 

I’ve been busy again. The local high school invited me and some other WWII vets to their “History Alive Program” to talk about our personal experiences. Three or four boys and/or girls spent about 15 or 20 minutes  at each session with artifacts to talk about. As shown in the photo, my main item was a map of Europe my son had made for me showing my route with the Third. Korean vets were scheduled to attend the next session, followed by Vietnam and then Iraqi vets. I thought you might like to know about some of the activity going on in the St. Louis area.Rock of the Marne,
Wimpy

Winfred “Wimpy” Kenner shares photos and a map of where he served with a Lindbergh High School student during History Alive March 15. Kenner served in the Army from 1943-1945.

 

A Letter Marked Free:
A Powerful and Gripping Account of a Combat Soldier in WWII
by Robert Lynch
A Letter Marked Free is the true story of a young combat soldier on the battlefield in World War II as told through his letters home to his family. The letters powerfully portray life on the front lines and the vivid accounts reveal the intense hardships endured for the cause of freedom.

Bob Lynch was nineteen and living in Rye, NY, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. He enlisted in the U.S. Army and served in the 3rd Infantry Division as a combat rifleman, light machine-gunner, and mortarman. Bob was wounded and missing in action (MIA) behind enemy lines for over 10 days. He received the Bronze Star, Purple Heart, and Combat Infantryman Badge, along with many other honors. He participated in first-wave amphibious assault landings on Anzio, Italy, and St. Tropez, France, and accumulated an incredible 350 days in frontline combat.

Bob was awarded the French Legion of Honor in January 2007 in recognition and gratitude for his role in the liberation of France. He received France's highest decoration "for outstanding valor and service during WWII." Previously, he had been awarded the French Croix de Guerre with Palm twice and coveted fourragere.
http://www.amazon.com/Letter-Marked-Free-Powerful-Gripping/dp/1608444198/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1335310797&sr=1-1

 

April 20-21, 2012: Audie Murphy Days will be held at the Audie Murphy/American Cotton Museum in Greenville, Texas. For additional information, please contact the Museum at (903) 450-4502, visit our website at www.cottonmuseum.com or e-mail us at amacm@att.net.

Audie Murphy Days Kicks off April 20th 

GREENVILLE, Texas - To honor and remember our nation’s military heroes, Audie Murphy Days will kick off Friday, April 20th.  The annual two day event, which is free and open to the public, is hosted by the Audie Murphy/American Cotton Museum in conjunction with local military service organizations to celebrate Audie Leon Murphy, the most decorated soldier of World War II, as well as military veterans and those currently serving our country.

Audie Murphy Days, April 20th and 21st, centers on Audie Murphy, a native son of Hunt County, war hero, Hollywood film star and accomplished songwriter.  This year’s events will consist of a variety of ceremonies, music, displays, speakers and demonstrations.  Noted speakers include retired U-2 pilot Lt. Col. Greg Barber, actor Michael Dante who was in Apache Rifles and Arizona Raiders with Audie and is best known for his starring role in Winterhawk and retired Sgt. R.V. Burgin.  Sgt. Burgin wrote a book about his experiences during WWII, titled Islands of the Damned, which was an inspiration for the HBO miniseries “The Pacific” that was produced by Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks and he is portrayed in the documentary by Irish actor Martin McCann.

New this year will be a Military Expo on the morning of the 21st from 9-11:30 featuring a number of re-enactors, soldiers, exhibit displays by area military museums, audie memorabilia displays, firearm displays and a demonstration by the junior ROTC.  Also includes a current field medic display and a civil war medic display with re-enactors to illustrate the differences that have occurred in the military field medic field over the years.  A panel discussion will also take place in the smaller room with active and retired soldiers.  Also new this year will be a very moving POW/MIA ceremony in front of the statue on Saturday night.      

Friday’s events will be held at the Civic Center at 5501 Hwy 69 South in Greenville beginning at 9:00 a.m. and will close the evening with Audie Bingo and a concert by local favorite Lou Ann Petty who will regale the audience with Patsy Cline hits, as well as some of her own original numbers.  The concert (dinner is included) is one of the few events that are not free.  Tickets are now on sale and cost $10 for adults/$5 for children 5-12 yrs. old.  Saturday’s events will begin at the Civic Center at 9:00 a.m. and will move to the Museum located at 600 I-30 East in Greenville in the afternoon.   A regular admission charge of $6 adults, $4 seniors and $2 students will apply to enter the Museum.  Re-admittance for the weekend into the Museum will be free.  These are just some of the activities taking place.  Contact the Audie Murphy/American Cotton Museum at (903) 450-4502 or visit the website at www.cottonmuseum.com for additional information.  Funding for this event is provided in part by the City of Greenville Hotel/Motel Occupancy Tax.

 

Membership Chairman Henry Burke

In case you haven't heard, Henry had a stroke . He's still in the hospital. He's getting stronger everyday. You know Henry, he has a great attitude so I think think he will do well.

Love,

Pennie

 

http://koreanwar.defense.gov

The USPS took this Korean War stamp off sale as of March 31, 2005. As they do with all stamps, any stamps that are left are destroyed. However, Dick Gallmeyer has sheets of 20 of these 37 cent Korean War Veterans Memorial stamps which are still able to be used. If you have an interest in these, contact:
Dick Gallmeyer, 1125 Evert Dr., Virginia Beach, VA  23464
Email: msg1gal@aol.com  Telephone: 1-800-523-4715

 

 Society of the 30th Infantry Regiment Association

Regrettably, The Society of the 30th Infantry Association has ceased to exist for the following reasons:

Morris Kirk’s physical condition has not improved to the extent that he can pick up where he left off a year ago. Our membership has dropped below 200 members which makes it impossible for us to mail the Friscan Reporter at bulk mail rates. That would make it very expensive to continue to print and mail the newsletter. We ceased to receive input for the newsletter from more than a handful of our members a long time ago. Morris’ source of articles for the newsletter dried up.

The 1st Battalion at Ft. Stewart said they did not want the Friscan Reporter to end so they would take care of it. However, as far as we know, only one copy has been printed and posted on the internet.
With Regrets,
Carl Q. Topie

 

The Society of the 3rd Infantry Division welcomes its two newest members, Soldier of the Year, Specialist Brandon Clouser, Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 1st Heavy Brigade Combat Team, and NCO of the Year, Sgt Andrew Song, Troop A, 3rd Squadron, 1st U.S. Cavalry, 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team
News from Arizona Renegade Outpost #15:

L-R  Michael Grimes, Robert Johnson, Curtis Gentry, John M. Torres Jr., Margaret Gentry, Donitza Williams, Richard McKiddy, Barbara McKiddy.

The outpost semi-annual meeting was held on Sunday March 25, 2012 at Brother's Family Restaurant in Peoria Arizona.  Following a noon meal, the meeting was conducted which included a review of the outpost participation in the Phoenix Veterans Day Parade, the treasures report and a discussion regarding next year's officer elections.  It was decided that the outpost would again enter the Veterans Day Parade and hold the next meeting following the parade in November 2012.  In addition, John Max Torres Jr. was introduced as a guest of Curtis Gentry.  John's brother, uncle (both Cold War Veterans) and a nephew (Iraq War Veteran) have all have served with the Third Infantry Division.  John is a U.S. Navy Veteran and attorney from Auburn Washington.
Thank You,
Curtis Gentry
Secretary-Treasurer, OP15 Vice-President, Western Region, Society of the Third Infantry Division, U.S. Army

 

Recently, the Smithsonian Institute announced that it would permanently hang a portrait of one of 5 people of national prominence in one of the most revered museums in America and the world ... the National Museum of American History.

 

The good news is that Audie Murphy is one of the candidates but the bad news is that he is lagging behind in the vote.

 

I am asking that every person receiving this email use the link below and cast a vote for Audie Murphy. It costs absolutely nothing and it could influence a permanent exhibit in Audie Murphy's behalf at the Smithsonian Institute.

 

After voting, please consider forwarding this email on to any friends you may have or post it on your Facebook page or other blog if you have one.

 

Your vote for Audie is greatly appreciated.

 

Link to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History:

http://blog.americanhistory.si.edu/

 

Sincerely Yours,

Richard Rodgers

http://www.audiemurphy.com/

 


Van T. Barfoot

Medal of Honor Recipient and Life Member of the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division, has passed away today (March 2, 2012). He was born on June 15,1919 and served as COL with A & C CO, 1 BN in World War II in 1946.

The Congressional Medal of Honor Society announces that Colonel Van T. Barfoot, Medal of Honor recipient, passed away Friday, March 2, 2012 in Richmond, Virginia at age 92.

He was awarded the Medal of Honor by Lt. Gen. Alexander M. Patch III in Epinal, France, on September 28, 1944.

His heroic action occurred near Carano, Italy on May 23, 1944. Army Technical Sergeant Barfoot served as a Platoon Sergeant, 45th Infantry Division, 3d Platoon, Company L 3d Battalion, 157th Infantry.

Van Barfoot was a Choctaw Indian from Mississippi, and a second lieutenant in the Thunderbirds. On May 23, 1944, during the breakout from Anzio to Rome, Barfoot knocked out two machine gun nests and captured 17 German soldiers. Later that same day, he repelled a German tank assault, destroyed a Nazi fieldpiece and while returning to camp carried two wounded commanders to safety.

Remember the guy who wouldn't take the flag down?
Thanks to John C. Clark (OP2) for sending this on an email

You might remember a news story several months ago about a crotchety old man who defied his homeowners association and refused to take down the flagpole on his property and the large flag that flew on it. Now you can find out who, exactly, that old man was.
If that wasn't enough for a day's work, he later took on and destroyed three German tanks sent to retake the machine gun positions.
That probably didn't make much news either, given the scope of the war, but it did earn Van T. Barfoot, who retired as a colonel after also serving in Korea and Vietnam , a Congressional Medal of Honor.
What did make news was a neighborhood association's quibble with how the 90-year-old veteran chose to fly the American flag outside his suburban Virginia home. Seems the rules said a flag could be flown on a house-mounted bracket, but, for decorum, items such as Barfoot's 21-foot flagpole were unsuitable.
He had been denied a permit for the pole, erected it anyway and was facing court action if he didn't take it down. Since the story made national TV, the neighborhood association has rethought its position
and agreed to indulge this old hero who dwells among them.
 
"In the time I have left I plan to continue to fly the American flag without interference," Barfoot told The Associated Press. As well he should. And if any of his neighbors still takes a notion to contest him, they might want to read his Medal of Honor citation. It indicates he's not real good at backing down.

Van T. Barfoot's Medal of Honor citation:
This 1944 Medal of Honor citation, listed with the National Medal of Honor Society, is for
Second Lieutenant Van T. Barfoot, 157th Infantry, 45th Infantry

WE ONLY LIVE IN THE LAND OF THE FREE... BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE! AND, BECAUSE OF OLD MEN LIKE VAN BARFOOT!

Van T. Barfoot is an Honored Member of Outpost 5845 of the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division

 

Postal Rates 2012
The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service announced on Tuesday a one-cent increase in the cost of mailing a letter, starting in January. The new prices lift the cost of a first-class stamp to 45 cents starting on January 22, 2012, the first increase in more than two years. The Postal Service is facing a financial crisis because mail volumes have declined as more people use electronic mail or the services of private sector competitors such as FedEx and United Parcel Service. The Postal Service said the cost to mail a postcard will go up three cents to 32 cents, letters to Canada or Mexico will increase five cents to 85 cents, and letters to other international locations will increase seven cents to $1.05. The agency, which is allowed to raise prices in line with the rate of inflation, said it filed the new prices with the Postal Regulatory Commission on Tuesday. The regulator has 45 days to approve the changes.

Until the price changes take effect, consumers can still purchase 44-cent Forever stamps, which do not require additional postage after prices go up. "The overall average price increase is small and is needed to help address our current financial crisis," said Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe. "We continue to take actions within our control to increase revenue in other ways and to aggressively cut costs."

The Postal Service has asked Congress for permission to drastically overhaul its business. Since the decline in the economy many industries are changing they way they work. The differences in the jewelry market are a great example. The gold market and tungsten carbide market have changed drastically. The Postal Service must make the same changes, including cutting Saturday mail delivery and eliminating a massive annual payment to prefund retiree health benefits. The agency also is studying thousands of post offices and processing facilities for possible closure.
Source: Reuters Emily Stephenson article 18 Oct 2011 ++]
OIF Mail
With the announcement that the 43,000 U.S. troops left in Iraq will leave by the end of the year, the U.S. Postal Service will soon stop accepting mail addressed to military post offices in the country. After 17 NOV, USPS will delete the ZIP codes for Iraq military post offices from its databases, Defense officials announced Wednesday. Items en route to Iraq as of 17 NOV still will be delivered. Service members remaining in Iraq under assignments for the Office of Security Cooperation or the Chief of Mission in Iraq will receive mail through the State Department embassy and consulate post offices.
Wreaths Across America Update
2011 will mark the 20th anniversary of Worcester Wreath Company donating Maine wreaths to adorn the headstones of our Nation¡¦s veterans at Arlington National Cemetery. In addition to 15,000 wreaths destined for Virginia, Worcester Wreath will again donate 7 ceremonial wreaths to over 410 State, National and local cemeteries across the Country. Also, continuing a tradition started in 2009, wreath-laying ceremonies will be coordinated in 24 foreign cemeteries and aboard Naval ships in all Seven Seas.. In response to the many voices who wanted to share in the project, the non-profit Wreaths Across America (WAA) organization was formed (EIN: 20-8362270) to expand the program by offering supporters the opportunity to sponsor a wreath. Their goal is to one day see every veterans grave in the country covered to honor every veteran during the holidays.

The 2011 Schedule of events is:
 Sunday, December 4th, 2011
 Start of World¡¦s Longest Veterans Parade from Maine to Arlington National Cemetery and participating locations
 Monday, December 5th
 State House wreath-laying ceremonies in all 50 States and Puerto Rico
 Saturday December 10th, 12:00 noon (EST)
 Simultaneous wreath laying ceremonies at nearly 600 locations all across the country and beyond.
Anyone desiring to participate or help bring sponsored wreaths to their local community can contact WAA who will help connect them with other groups already working in their area. Contact can be made via 877-385-9504;
207-470-0967;Fax 866-956-1625; or mail to Wreaths Across America, PO Box 249, Columbia Falls, ME 04623.
Those desiring to sponsor a wreath can do so by filling out a sponsorship form available at http://www.wreathsacrossamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Downloadable-Order-Form-for-website.pdf.
Note that the Wreaths Across America national office is not able to accommodate grave-specific requests. However, you may choose a specific location from the hundreds of participating sites across the country which can be found at http://www.wreathsacrossamerica.org/locations/. The leader for that location MAY be able to accommodate a grave specific request. [Source: Veterans Corner with Michael Isam article 17 Oct 2011 ++]

 

3rd ID Headquarters to Deploy to Afghanistan
3rd ID's Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion is scheduled to head to Afghanistan in August.
The deployment is expected to last a year.
3rd ID Headquarters tapped for year in Afghanistan
Posted: January 20, 2012
Corey Dickstein/Savannah Morning News
By Corey Dickstein

Maj. Gen. Robert Abrams, the 3rd Infantry Division commander,
will take command of International Security Assistance Forces Region Command South in August.
Corey Dickstein/Savannah Morning News

Pentagon offers details on shift in Afghan mission
By ROBERT BURNS, AP National Security Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) — Feb. 15, 2012---
The Pentagon on Wednesday offered new details of its plan for shifting from a combat mission in Afghanistan to one focused on training and advising Afghan forces as they gradually shoulder more of the combat burden.

The Army identified five U.S.-based brigades, as well as an Army Reserve organization, that will be reconfigured and sent to Afghanistan between April and August to "generate, employ and sustain" Afghan forces. The Army called this a "new mission" after more than 10 years of fighting in Afghanistan. Each brigade will deploy with fewer than half its assigned number of soldiers and will be comprised only of officers and senior noncommissioned officers, along with a contingent of Defense Department civilians. Once in Afghanistan they will operate in 18-person teams in a train-and-advise role. The concept is similar to the way the U.S. advised Iraqi security forces during the final 15 months of the Iraq war.

Army Lt. Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, the top U.S. commander of day-to-day military operations in Afghanistan, told reporters at the Pentagon last week that the 18-person teams will be linked to an American or coalition combat brigade and serve as a sort of bridge to the U.S. and NATO final exit from the battlefield. Scaparrotti said the teams will each work with an Afghan army or police unit.
"By doing that, we maintain our connectivity to the Afghan forces as we thin out," Scaparrotti said.
In areas were the insurgency is especially active or Afghan forces are especially weak, the American advisory teams may have a rifle platoon operating with them for added protection, Scaparrotti said.

As the 18-person teams head for Afghanistan, at least 23,000 U.S. combat and support forces are due to leave, in line with President Barack Obama's plan to reduce the total U.S. military presence to 68,000 by the end of September. This is the beginning of a transition away from a combat role for U.S. and coalition forces, a process that Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has said may be completed as early as mid-2013. Although U.S. troops participating in the train-and-advise mission will be armed and prepared to defend themselves, their role is to prepare the Afghan army to take full security responsibility by the end of 2014. The Pentagon did not say where in Afghanistan the first train-and-advise teams would operate.

The reconfigured Army brigades that will deploy starting in April are the 2nd Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division, from Fort Campbell, Ky.; the 2nd Brigade of the 3rd Infantry Division, from Fort Stewart, Ga.; the 3rd Brigade of the 4th Infantry Division, from Fort Carson, Colo.; the 4th Brigade of the 1st Armored Division, from Fort Bliss, Texas; and the 162nd Infantry Brigade from Fort Polk, La.

Also part of the deployment will be an unannounced number of soldiers from the 1st Army, an organization based at Rock Island Arsenal, Ill., whose usual mission is to mobilize, train and deploy National Guard and Reserve soldiers.

Robert Burns can be followed on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/robertburnsAP
Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

 

Society Member Joe Aiello Honored with French Legion of Honor in Ceremony

Mr. Joseph Aiello of Hudson, Massachusetts was awarded the French Legion of Honor by the French Consul General in Boston, Mr. Christophe Guilhou, at a ceremony in the Hudson Senior Center on 31 January.  The French Legion of Honor is the highest decoration in France and it was awarded to Mr. Aiello for his combat service in France during WWII with the 15th Infantry Regiment of the 3rd Infantry Division.  Mr. Aiello served as a Medic with the Regiment’s Medical Detachment.  He joined the unit in March 1943 and served with it for the remainder of the war in Tunisia, Italy, France, and Germany, and in the early days of occupation outside Salzburg, Austria.

In his comments Mr. Aiello remembered the soldiers who did not return to their families from the war, and the families of the fallen. 

Captain Monika Stoy, President of the European Outpost of the Society of the 3rd Infantry Division, had assisted Mr. Aiello in having the Legion of Honor awarded to him, and worked closely with the Hudson Senior Center Director, Janice Long, in ensuring the event was memorable for Mr. Aiello and all the residents of Hudson.  In her introductory comments Captain Stoy emphasized the importance of preserving history and including young people in such ceremonies as they must be the ones to carry on the memory of these great veterans.

Lieutenant Colonel Tim Stoy, President of the 15th Infantry Regiment Association, served as master of ceremonies for the event and also delivered post-award comments honoring Mr. Aiello’s service in the 15th Infantry.   


Joe and Catherine Aiello with Consul General and the Stoys

Outpost 5845 Report
Submitted by Monika Stoy

The last edition of the Watch omitted mention of four dignitaries who participated in the Colmar Pocket Historical seminar and commemoration in December – General, retired, Gordon Sullivan, former Chief of Staff of the Army and current President of the Association of the United States Army opened the seminars with welcoming comments to the veterans present and a historical overview of the Battle of the Colmar Pocket. In his comments General Sullivan stressed the individual soldier nature of the battle in the terrible conditions experienced that winter.  He presented coins to the veterans as well as copies of General Kroesen’s book, 75 years in the Army.  Additionally, Major General Tony Cucolo, former 3ID Commander, and his wife Ginger stopped by on the second day to thank the veterans present and presented coins to each veteran. 

Major General Jimmie Jay Wells, Commander of the 75th Mission Command Training Division participated in the entire event.   Major General Marchi, Commander of the 28th Infantry Division, attended the Saturday evening banquet with his spouse, Peg.  Both MG Wells and MG Marchi thanked the veterans present for their outstanding WWII combat service.

There will be a plaque dedication ceremony in Bad Brueckenau, Germay on 1 May.  This will be the first plaque commemorating the Division’s long Cold War service in Germany.  Bad Brueckenau was home to many families of soldiers stationed at Wildflecken with the 2-15th Infantry.  Bad Brueckenau hosted 3ID veterans last May.

Upcoming events include:

19-22 July - Operation Dragoon commemorative ceremony and historical seminars at the Sheraton National Hotel, Arlington and Arlington National Cemetery.

15 August – Dedication of a traffic circle in Grimaud, Provence, France in honor of the 3rd Infantry Division.  Grimaud was liberated by the 1st Bn, 30th Infantry late on D-Day in Operation Dragoon. 

6-9 December – Battle of the Colmar Pocket commemorative ceremony and historical seminars at the Sheraton National Hotel, Arlington, Virginia.


MG Cuculo with Charles Phelan

MG Marchi, MG Ramsey, Monika, COL Houdet,
COL Ryan, MG Wells at banquet

General Sullivan thanks audience

 

Third Infantry Division Monument Left at Fort Benning
With the construction of the new Infantry Museum at Fort Benning, our beautiful Third Infantry Division Monument has been left behind at the old Infantry Museum location. This monument honors the 3rd Infantry Division and was dedicated during the Society of the Third Infantry Division Reunion at Ft. Benning in 1992. There is a place set aside at the new museum for the monuments from the old location.

It is estimated the cost for moving our monument and setting it in the new location will be about $8,000. If every active duty Soldier and all Veterans could give from $1.00 to $10.00 each, we would have the
funds to move the monument. It is possible that we could receive enough donations to add another wing to honor our Soldiers who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Eight thousand of us each giving a dollar would cover the cost. Giving a bit more will insure the success of the fundraising effort, and will conclude the fundraising as soon as possible. The sooner we move the monument the better will be our location at the new museum.

To help, please send your contribution, identified as “monument relocation,” to:

Ray Anderson,
10 Paddington Ct.
Hockessin, DE 19707-9766
 

Thank you for your help.
—Bob Bailey, Chair of the Monument Moving Committee

 

Pentagon offers details on shift in Afghan mission
By ROBERT BURNS, AP National Security Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) — Feb. 15, 2012---
The Pentagon on Wednesday offered new details of its plan for shifting from a combat mission in Afghanistan to one focused on training and advising Afghan forces as they gradually shoulder more of the combat burden.

The Army identified five U.S.-based brigades, as well as an Army Reserve organization, that will be reconfigured and sent to Afghanistan between April and August to "generate, employ and sustain" Afghan forces. The Army called this a "new mission" after more than 10 years of fighting in Afghanistan. Each brigade will deploy with fewer than half its assigned number of soldiers and will be comprised only of officers and senior noncommissioned officers, along with a contingent of Defense Department civilians. Once in Afghanistan they will operate in 18-person teams in a train-and-advise role. The concept is similar to the way the U.S. advised Iraqi security forces during the final 15 months of the Iraq war.

Army Lt. Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, the top U.S. commander of day-to-day military operations in Afghanistan, told reporters at the Pentagon last week that the 18-person teams will be linked to an American or coalition combat brigade and serve as a sort of bridge to the U.S. and NATO final exit from the battlefield. Scaparrotti said the teams will each work with an Afghan army or police unit.
"By doing that, we maintain our connectivity to the Afghan forces as we thin out," Scaparrotti said.
In areas were the insurgency is especially active or Afghan forces are especially weak, the American advisory teams may have a rifle platoon operating with them for added protection, Scaparrotti said.

As the 18-person teams head for Afghanistan, at least 23,000 U.S. combat and support forces are due to leave, in line with President Barack Obama's plan to reduce the total U.S. military presence to 68,000 by the end of September. This is the beginning of a transition away from a combat role for U.S. and coalition forces, a process that Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has said may be completed as early as mid-2013. Although U.S. troops participating in the train-and-advise mission will be armed and prepared to defend themselves, their role is to prepare the Afghan army to take full security responsibility by the end of 2014. The Pentagon did not say where in Afghanistan the first train-and-advise teams would operate.

The reconfigured Army brigades that will deploy starting in April are the 2nd Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division, from Fort Campbell, Ky.; the 2nd Brigade of the 3rd Infantry Division, from Fort Stewart, Ga.; the 3rd Brigade of the 4th Infantry Division, from Fort Carson, Colo.; the 4th Brigade of the 1st Armored Division, from Fort Bliss, Texas; and the 162nd Infantry Brigade from Fort Polk, La.

Also part of the deployment will be an unannounced number of soldiers from the 1st Army, an organization based at Rock Island Arsenal, Ill., whose usual mission is to mobilize, train and deploy National Guard and Reserve soldiers.

Robert Burns can be followed on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/robertburnsAP
Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

 

Coastal Courier
Soldiers will deploy in Feb. and April

Tours expected to last nine months
POSTED: January 6, 2012

Two battalions representing about 1,500 soldiers from the 3rd Infantry Division’s 2nd Heavy Brigade Combat Team are preparing to deploy to Afghanistan, according to news releases recently issued by the 3rd ID’s public affairs office. The 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment’s “Battle Boars” will deploy next month, and the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment’s “Desert Rogues” will deploy in April, according to a Jan. 4 release.

The release stated that this is the first time either unit has deployed to Afghanistan. However, both units previously have deployed to Iraq four times with the 3rd ID’s 2nd HBCT, having most recently returned from their last one-year combat tour in October 2010.

Family members of the deploying soldiers should know the upcoming tour of duty is expected to last nine months instead of 12, according to a Jan. 3 release, which reiterated that the U.S. Army is transitioning to a new deployment period policy that was announced by the Secretary of the Army in August. The shorter tours took effect Jan. 1.

The mission of the 800 soldiers from the 1-30th Infantry is to provide security for other units conducting contingency operations, and they will provide security for units conducting village stability operations in Afghanistan, the release said. The 700 soldiers from the 1-64th Armor will deploy as part of a Stryker brigade combat team already deployed to Afghanistan from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., the release added.

According to www.sbct.army.mil/About-Us.html, a Stryker brigade combat team is a mechanized infantry force structured around the eight-wheeled Interim Armored Vehicle called the Stryker. A Stryker brigade combat team has the armor advantages of a heavy brigade combat team with its Bradley Fighting Vehicle and the mobility advantages of an infantry brigade combat team, which features “light” infantry units.

Accordingly, the Desert Rogues will increase that Stryker unit’s capability to perform multilevel counterinsurgency operations. They’ll also assist in training Afghanistan National Security Forces, preparing them to lead security efforts in their country.

Both news releases emphasize that Marne Division soldiers are flexible regarding worldwide deployment requirements and ready for any contingency operation. The releases stated the 3rd ID always will meet requirements for contingency operations with well-trained units.

Courier staffer Randy Murray contributed to this report.
© 2012 Hinesville Publishing - All Rights Reserved


UPDATE:
Battalions to Deploy in February and April

Two Fort Stewart battalions, the 1-30 Infantry and the 1-64 Armor,
will head to Afghanistan this year.

Two Fort Stewart battalions will deploy to Afghanistan in February and April, according to the 3rd Infantry Division public affairs office.

The 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment and 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment -- both part of 3rd ID's 2nd Brigade Combat Team -- will deploy in 2012, according to a press release. About 1,500 troops will deploy, rather than the 1,600 estimated in an earlier 3rd ID press release.

The 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, scheduled to deploy in February, consists of about 800 soliders. Their mission in Afghanistan will be "to provide security to units conducting contingency operations in Afghanistan, as well as support for stability operations," according to the release.

The 700 soldiers of the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment will deploy in April to support a Stryker brigade already in Afghanistan. The Fort Stewart battalion will help the Stryker Brigade perform counterinsurgency operations and train Afghan National Security Forces, the release stated.

This will be the units' first deployment to Afghanistan, although both units have previously deployed to Iraq.

Each deployment is expected to last about nine months, the release stated. The nine-month timeframe is in line with the Army's new policy of shorter deployments, which took effect Jan. 1.


The 2012 Roster Book of the
Society of the 3rd Infantry Division



Front Cover by Justin Valle
Edited and compiled by Rich Heller

Last Update December 01, 2013

Contents - Society of the 3ID Website
eXTReMe Tracker